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New Directors' Orientation Tutorial

The New Directors' Orientation Tutorial is made up of 14 self-paced modules to assist in learning basic program requirements. Each module is designed to be utilized based on a Director’s specific needs; there is not a set sequence for the tutorial to be completed. We encourage Directors to jump to the module that best fits their needs. Select a module below to view or download the corresponding materials.

Module 1 Icon

1. Migrant Education Program Overview

All Module Materials
Overview
Supporting Materials

Section 1: Getting Started

Getting Started
In This Section
Tutorial Objectives
How to Use the Tutorial
Icons to Guide You
Key Readings and Resources
3
Tutorial Objectives
Module 1 will enable new state directors to
1. understand the legislative and regulatory requirements of the
Migrant Education Program (MEP),
2. understand the goals and objectives of the MEP,
3. identify the key components of the MEP,
4. learn strategies for effectively administering the state MEP, and
5. review key resources available to help administer the state MEP.
4
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should
allow sufficient time to read the slides, reflect on the information, and
complete all activities on the slides or on the Quick Resource and
Reflection Sheets (QRRS) that can be downloaded as worksheets;
read each slide as well as the information referenced in the slides;
engage with the “What Do You Think?” slides to facilitate interaction
with the information (Answers will be provided directly following each
of these slides.);
5
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should (continued)
pause to reflect on your state program at the “Check-in” slides
(A QRRS document will typically accompany these.);
complete the “Pop Quiz!” slides to reinforce key concepts;
review your state’s MEP documents and reports as directed;
develop an action plan using the worksheets provided;
add actionable items to your MEP planning calendar (See QRRS 14.2
for a template.); and
contact your OME Program Officer for follow-up questions.
6
Icons to Guide You
The following icons will guide you in making the best use of this tutorial:
What Do You Think?
Check-in
Pop Quiz!
Quick Reference and Reflection Sheet (QRRS)
Action Planning
Calendar Item
7
Key Readings and Resources
You should have these documents readily available while completing
the module, as the module will refer to these documents for more
complete information on various topics.
MEP Guidance on the Education of Migratory Children under Title I,
Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965
Glossary of Terms
8

Section 2: The Migrant Education Program

The Migrant
Education Program
9
In This Section
Common Characteristics of
Migrant Families
Challenges of Migrant Children
Migrant Education Program
Legal/Authoritative Reference for
Migrant Education Program
Common Characteristics of Migrant Families
Migrant agricultural workers and fishers share a number ofcommon
characteristics that pose significant challenges in their lives. They may:
Relocate repeatedly for work due to economicnecessity,
Be isolated from services,
Be economically disadvantaged,
Reside in sub-standard living conditions,
Have low levels of education, and/or
Have inadequate or non-existent health care.
MEP ID&R Manual
10
Common Characteristics of Migrant Families
Migrant families that migrate internationally may
Feel isolated from the larger community because they come froma
different culture and frequently speak a language other than English
(Some speak indigenous languages, making it difficult to find
interpreters and translated materials.),
Live in fear due to documentation and legal status issues.
MEP ID&R Manual
11
Challenges of Migrant Children
Because of these lifestyle characteristics, children of migrant workers
and young migrant workers face special challenges to doing well in
school.
Migration means changing schools, teachers, and curricula, as well as
chronic absenteeism for school-age children.
o Changing schools diminishes a student’s sense of belonging and
makes it more difficult to participate in the classroom and
extracurricular activities.
MEP ID&R Manual
12
Challenges of Migrant Children
Children of migrant workersmay have limited opportunities to learn
and practice the English language if:
o Their parents are not proficient in English, and/or
o The family spends part of the year in countries (and schools) in
which English is not commonly spoken.
MEP ID&R Manual
13
Challenges of Migrant Children
Migrant parents’ low levels of education and socioeconomic status
often limit the amount and quality of educational support that can be
offered in the home.
Temporary and seasonal jobs in agriculture and fishing do not
generally provide health insurance, which, coupled with low wages,
limits access to regular and adequate healthcare.
Lack of continuous residence and differences in language and culture
make migrant children susceptible to isolation and discrimination,
which may limit their access to services to which they are entitled.
MEP ID&R Manual
14
Challenges of Migrant Children
While schools are required by federal law to test every migrant child
who is enrolled in the school during the testing dates, they are not
required to aggregate the test scores of migrant children as a
separate subgroup. This hinders the ability to easily access data that
can be used to make decisions to provide educational services to
migrant students.
Without adequate sharing of migrant student information within and
across states, students may experience delays in enrollment, incorrect
grade placement, or loss of academic credit for courses completed.
MEP ID&R Manual
15
Migrant Education Program
In 1966, Congress enacted the MEP as a state- administered and -operated
program to reduce the unique challenges that children of migratory workers
experience, such as
High level of mobility,
Cultural and language barriers,
Social and community isolation,
Various health-related problems, and
Low household income.
16
Legal/Authoritative Reference for Migrant
Education Program
Title 1, Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as
amended, (ESEA) authorizes grants to states “to establish or
improve, directly or through local operating agencies, programs of
education for migratory children.”
17
Legal/Authoritative Reference for Migrant
Education Program
The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is an annual codification of the
general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the
executive departments and agencies of the Federal Government, and
provides applicable regulations related to the MEP.
18
Legal/Authoritative Reference for Migrant
Education Program
The MEP Guidance is designed to help state education agencies
(SEAs) and local operating agencies (LOAs) use MEP funds to develop
and implement supplemental educational and support services to
assist migratory children.
19
Legal/Authoritative Reference for Migrant
Education Program
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title I, Part C, Section 1301-
1309, as amended
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 CFR §§ 200.81 200.89
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance
20

Section 3: Overview of the Migrant Education Program

Overview of the
Migrant Education
Program
In This Section
Purpose of the Migrant Education
Program
Office of Migrant Education
Goals and Objectives of the Migrant
Education Program
21
Purpose of the Migrant Education Program
The purposes of the MEP are to:
1. Support high-quality and comprehensive educational programs for
migratory children to help reduce the educational disruptions and
other problems that result from repeated moves;
2. Ensure that migratory children who move among states are not
penalized in any manner by disparities among states in curriculum,
graduation requirements, and state academic content and student
academic achievement standards;
3. Ensure that migratory children are provided with appropriate
educational services (including supportive services) that address
their special needs in a coordinated and efficient manner;
22
Purpose of the Migrant Education Program
4. Ensure that migratory children receive the full and appropriate
opportunity to meet the same challenging state academic content
standards and challenging student academic achievement standards
that all children are expected to meet;
5. Design programs to help migratory children overcome educational
disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various
health-related problems, and other factors that inhibit the ability of
such children to do well in school, and to prepare such children to
make a successful transition to postsecondary education or
employment; and
6. Ensure that migratory children benefit from state and local system
reforms.
Section 1301 of the ESEA, as amended
23
Office of Migrant Education
The MEP falls under the purview of the Office of Migrant Education
(OME) in the U.S. Department of Education (ED). OME’s mission is to
provide:
Excellent leadership;
Technical assistance; and
Financial support to improve the educational opportunities of migrant
children, youth, agricultural workers, fishers, and their families.
OME Website
24
Office of Migrant Education
25
Office of
Migrant
Education
High School Equivalency
Program (HEP)
College Assistance Migrant
Program (CAMP)
Migrant
Education
Program
Adapted from:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/or/index.html?src=rt
Organizational Structure
Office of Migrant Education
The core function of OME is to support states through:
Grant and contract administration;
Legislation, budget, and policy guidance;
Evaluation and research;
Outreach; and
Special leadership initiatives.
MEP Guidance
26
Office of Migrant Education
Special initiatives overseen through OME include:
Targeting
o Identification & Recruitment,
o Comprehensive Needs Assessment,
o Subgrantee Monitoring, and
o Re-interview Initiative;
MEP Guidance
27
Office of Migrant Education
Service Delivery
o Planning,
o Implementation, and
o Evaluation of Evidenced-Based Programming; and
Coordination
o Migrant Student Records Exchange
MEP Guidance
28
Goals and Objectives of the Migrant Education
Program
The goal of the MEP is to assist all migrant students in meeting
challenging academic standards and achieving graduation from high
school (or a GED program) with an education that prepares them for
responsible citizenship, further learning, and productive employment.
29
Goals and Objectives of the Migrant Education
Program
States are charged with coordinating with other federal programs and
state and local education reform efforts to contribute to improved
school performance of migrant children so that migrant students
perform as well as non-migrant students.
OME provides technical assistance and fiscal support to strengthen
and support the efforts of states to continuously improve the quality of
education provided to migrant children.
30

Section 4: Key Components of the Migrant Education Program

Key Components of
the Migrant
Education Program
In This Section
Identification, Recruitment, and
Eligibility
State Migrant Education Program
Funding Allocation and Use of Funds
Program Planning Comprehensive
Needs Assessment and Service
Delivery Plan
31
Key Components of
the Migrant
Education Program
In This Section
Provision of Services
Parental Involvement
Program Coordination
Program Evaluation
Program Performance Reporting
Grants and Special Initiatives
32
Identification, Recruitment, and Eligibility
1. The SEA and LOAs must use the National Certificate of Eligibility
(COE) form established by the Secretary to document the state’s
determination of the eligibility of migratory children.
2. The SEA and its LOAs must maintain any additional documentation
the SEA requires to confirm that each child found eligible for the MEP
meets all of the eligibility requirements.
3. The SEA is responsible for the accuracy of all determinations of the
eligibility of migratory children identified in the state.
4. The SEA must establish and implement a system of quality controls
for the proper identification and recruitment of eligible migratory
children.
34 CRF § 200.89
See Module 2: Identification, Recruitment, and Eligibility
33
Identification, Recruitment, and Eligibility
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part A
Section 1115(b)(1)(A); Title I, Part C, Sections 1304(c)(7) and 1309(2)
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 CFR § 200.81 and 200.89 & 200.103(a)
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapters II & III
34
State Migrant Education Program Funding
Allocation and Use of Funds
Federal funds are allocated to states by formula to establish or
improve educational programs for migrant children. State funds may
be used for
o General administration of the state MEP,
o Administrative services that are unique to the MEP, and
o Delivery of services to migrant students by the SEA or through
subgrants and contracts.
35
State Migrant Education Program Funding
Allocation and Use of Funds
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part A,
Section 1004; Title I, Part C, Sections 1302, 1304(b)(5), 1304(d), and 1309;
Section 9201; GEPA sections 437(a) and 452(a)
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 CFR § 76.300-76.401, 76.560, 76.561, 76.563, 76.730, 76.731, 76.770,
77.1, 80, 200.82, 200.83(c), and 200.100(b)
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter XI
36
State Migrant Education Program Funding
Allocation and Use of Funds
In accordance with federal awards, a state may use MEP funds for costs
that meet the following general criteria:
Be necessary and reasonable for
proper and efficient performance
and administration of the MEP,
Conform with state and local laws,
Conform with federal law,
Be allocable (e.g., charged in
proportion to the value received by
the MEP and its children),
Be in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles
(GAAP), and
Be adequately documented.
See Module 3: State Migrant Education Program
Funding Allocation and Use of Funds
2 CFR Part 200
37
State Migrant Education Program Funding
Allocation and Use of Funds
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended, (ESEA), Title I, Section
1120A and Section 1304(c)(2); Title IX Sections 9101 and 9521
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 § CFR 200.88
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter X
38
Program Planning Comprehensive Needs
Assessment and Service Delivery Plan
States must ensure that the state and its LOAs identify and address the
special educational needs of migratory children in accordance with a
comprehensive state plan that:
May be submitted as part of a consolidated application,
Provides that migratory children will have an opportunity to meet the
same challenging state academic content standards and academic
achievement standards that all children are expected to meet,
39
Program Planning Comprehensive Needs
Assessment and Service Delivery Plan
Specifies measurable program goals and outcomes,
Encompasses a full range of available services,
Is the product of joint planning, and
Provides for the integration of services with those provided by other
programs.
Section 1306(a)(1) of the ESEA, as amended
See Module 7: Program Planning Service Delivery Plan
40
Program Planning Comprehensive Needs
Assessment and Service Delivery Plan
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part C,
Sections 1304(b) and 1306(a)
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 § CFR 200.83
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV
41
Provision of Services
For the purposes of the MEP, services are a subset of all the activities
that MEP provides through its program and projects.
Services are distinct in that they are the educational or educationally
related activities provided to migrant children to enable them to
succeed in school.
Sections 1304(c)(6) and 1306(b) of the ESEA, as amended
Sections 9101(37) and 9501 of the ESEA
See Module 3: State Migrant Education Program
Funding Allocation and Use of Funds
42
Provision of Services
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part C,
Sections 1304 and 1306; Sections 9101(37) and 9501 of Title IX
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 § CFR 200.29(c)(1), 200,83, 299.6-299.9
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter V
43
Parental Involvement
SEAs and LOAs are required to
Develop a comprehensive state plan in consultation with parents,
Consult with parent advisory councils (PACs) in programs that are one
school year in duration at both the State and local agency operating
level, and
Note: Short-term projects that do not last a full school year, e.g., a remedial math
tutoring program that is only offered during the first semester of school, do not require
the consultation of the PAC, but should include the input of migrant parents.
44
Parental Involvement
Plan and operate the MEP in a manner that provides for the same
parental involvement as is required in Section 1118 of the ESEA (for
Title I, Part A programs).
o The statute also requires parental involvement activities to be
conducted in a format and language understandable to parents.
Section 1118 of the ESEA
Sections 1304(c)(3) and 1306(a)(1)(B)(ii) of the ESEA, as amended
34 CFR § 200.83(b)
See Module 5: Parental Involvement
45
Parental Involvement
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA) , Title I, Part C,
Sections 1304(c)(3) and 1306(a)(1)(B)(ii); Section 1118 of Title I, Part A
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 § CFR 200.83(b)
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter VII
46
Program Coordination
Each state application must include a description of how the state and
its LOAs will ensure that the special educational needs of migrant
children are identified and addressed through
The full range of services that are available through local, state, and
federal educational programs;
Joint planning among educational programs;
The integration of services among educational programs; and
Measurable program goals and outcomes.
Section 1304(b)(1) of the ESEA, as amended
See Module 9: Program Coordination
47
Program Coordination
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part C,
Sections 1304(b)(1)(B) and (C); 1304 (b)(3), 1304(c)(1)(B), 1306(a)(1)(A), (F),
and (G), 1308(a), (b) and (d); Section 3124 of Title III, Part A
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 CFR § 200.81(e) and 200.103(a)
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter VI
48
Program Evaluation
States must plan, implement, and evaluate programs and projects that
ensure that the state and LOAs address the special educational needs
of migratory children, including preschool migratory children.
Section 1304(b)(1) of the ESEA, as amended
49
Program Evaluation
SEAs are required to determine program effectiveness through a written
evaluation of both program implementation and program results
,
particularly for those students who have Priority for Services (PFS).
34 CFR § 200.84
See Module 8: Program Planning Migrant Education Program Evaluation
50
Program Evaluation
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, ), as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part C,
Sections 1301(4), 1303(e), 1304(b)(1) and (2), 1304(c)(5), 1304(d)l
1306(a)(1)(C) and (D)
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 CFR § 200.83, 200.84, 200.85
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter VIII
51
Program Performance Reporting
Each year, states must provide MEP specific program performance
information through the Consolidated State Performance Report (CSPR)
Part II, including:
o The annual unduplicated count of migrant children, and
o A detailed narrative that describes the procedures the states
followed to obtain and verify the child count.
Using the CSPR simplifies the reporting process and reduces the
reporting burden on each state.
Section 9303 of the ESEA, as amended
52
Program Performance Reporting
Statute
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), Title I, Part C,
Sections 1303(e); 1304(c)(7) and (e); Title IX, Part C, Section 9303
Code of Federal Regulations (Revised as of July 1, 2010)
34 CFR § 200.81
Guidance (October 23, 2010)
MEP Guidance, Chapter IX
53

Section 5: Grants and Special Initiatives

Grants and Special
Initiatives
In This Section
Grants and Special Initiatives
54
Grants and Special Initiatives
In addition to the administration of the MEP, the OME administers other
grant programs and special initiatives, including
The Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX),
MEP Consortium Incentive Grants (CIGS),
High School Equivalency Program (HEP),
College Assistance Migrant Programs CAMP), and
See Module 12: Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX)
See Module 13: Grants and Special Initiatives
55

Section 6: Wrapping Up

Wrapping Up
In This Section
Key Points
Where to Begin
Next Steps
Resources
56
Key Points
The purpose of MEP is to address the special educational needs of
migrant children so that they have a full opportunity to meet the same
state academic standards as all other children.
OME administers the MEP.
Legal and authoritative references for the MEP include:
o Sections 1301-1309 of the ESEA, as amended;
o Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations §§ 200.81-200.89; and
o MEP Guidance of 2010.
OME provides states funds to carry out the MEP; the state director
oversees the state MEP.
The state MEP includes a number of interrelated program
components.
57
Where to Begin
As a new state director, you may feel that there is an overwhelming
array of information to learn and activities to undertake.
The New State Directors’ Orientation Tutorial is an important first step
to enable you to learn about the MEP at the federal, state, and local
level.
We encourage you to take the time necessary to review each module
and complete all activities.
o Activities in the Tutorial will provide the foundation for you to
develop a master plan of action and calendar items to guide all
activities for the MEP.
58
Next Steps
Working through the New State Directors’ Orientation Tutorial, you will
Familiarize yourself with the law, regulations, and guidance for the
MEP;
Familiarize yourself with the state MEP;
Identify the major program components for which you are responsible;
Develop action plans for each of the program components;
Start an MEP Master Calendar (See QRRS 14.2 for a template.) to
help you track important tasks; and
Identify technical assistance materials, resources, and supports to
have easily accessible.
59
Migrant Education Program Resources
MEP Guidance on the Education of Migratory Children under Title I,
Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965
Explanation of the laws and regulations related to the MEP, and
recommendations for sound practice
MEP Identification and Recruitment Manual In-depth explanation of
identification and recruitment (ID&R), recruiter’s role, administrator’s
role, and quality control
60
Migrant Education Program Resources
National ID&R Curriculum Designed for MEP staff, trainers, and
recruiters, this eight module training provides a framework for
recruiter development
Technical Assistance Guide on Re-interviewing Resource for state
agency personnel to use during re-interviewing
Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit Suggested step-by-step
guide with tools and templates to develop the CNA
Service Delivery Plan Toolkit Suggested step-by-step guide with tools
and templates to develop the SDP
61
Migrant Education Program Resources
Program Evaluation Toolkit Suggested step-by-step guide with tools
and templates to develop the Program Evaluation
Consolidated State Performance Report (CSPR) Part IIForm for
annual MEP state reporting
MSIX Website Access to MSIX login, user manuals, and training
materials
MSIX Guides and Fact Sheets Provides tools and resources for MSIX
users
62
Migrant Education Program Resources
MEP Consortium Incentive Grants (CIG) Links to current CIG projects
High School Equivalency Program (HEP) Links to current HEP
projects and contacts
College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) Links to current CAMP
projects and contacts
63
Migrant Education Program Resources
MEP Officers List of OME contact information
(https://results.ed.gov/about/contact)
MEP State Profiles Includes links to state MEP contact information
(https://results.ed.gov/resources/state_program_information)
Glossary of Terms Alphabetical listing of key terms applicable to
migrant education (https://results.ed.gov/idr-
manual/section/glossary/glossary)
64