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New Directors' Orientation Tutorial

The New Directors' Orientation Tutorial is made up of 14 self-paced modules to assist in learning basic program requirements. Each module is designed to be utilized based on a Director’s specific needs; there is not a set sequence for the tutorial to be completed. We encourage Directors to jump to the module that best fits their needs. Select a module below to view or download the corresponding materials.

Module 13 Icon

13. Grants and Special Initiatives

Section 1: Getting Started

Getting Started
In This Section
Tutorial Objectives
How to Use the Tutorial
Icons to Guide You
Key Readings and Resources
3
Tutorial Objectives
Module 13 will enable new state directors to
1. understand the background and the legislative and regulatory
requirements for Migrant Education Program (MEP) supporting
grants and special initiatives;
2. explore Consortium Incentive Grants (CIG);
3. explore the High School Equivalency Program (HEP) and College
Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) and identify HEP and CAMP
grants in their states;
4. connect with HEP and CAMP grants;
5. understand the challenges of binational migrant students; and
6. create a customized action plan for identifying MEP supplemental
grants, and special initiatives in their states, and leverage resources
for statewide improvement of migrant education services.
4
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should
allow sufficient time to read the slides, reflect on the information, and
complete all activities on the slides or on the Quick Resource and
Reflection Sheets (QRRS) that can be downloaded as worksheets;
read each slide as well as the information referenced in the slides;
engage with the “What Do You Think?” slides to facilitate interaction
with the information (Answers will be provided directly following each
of these slides.);
5
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should (continued)
pause to reflect on your state program at the “Check-in” slides
(A QRRS document will typically accompany these.);
complete the “Pop Quiz!” slides to reinforce key concepts;
review your state’s MEP documents and reports as directed;
develop an action plan using the worksheets provided;
add actionable items to your MEP planning calendar (QRRS 14.2); and
contact your OME Program Officer for follow-up questions.
6
Icons to Guide You
The following icons will guide you in making the best use of this tutorial:
What Do You Think?
Check-in
Pop Quiz!
Quick Reference and Reflection Sheet (QRRS)
Action Planning
Calendar Item
7
Key Readings and Resources
You should have these documents readily available while completing
the module, as the module will refer to these documents for more
complete information on various topics.
MEP Guidance on the Education of Migratory Children under Title I,
Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965
The Binational Migrant Education Teacher Exchange Program
8

Section 2: Overview of Grants and Special Initiatives

Overview of Grants and
Special Initiatives
9
Overview of Grants and Special Initiatives
In addition to administering the MEP, the Office of Migrant Education
(OME) administers several other grant programs, and participates in
special initiatives to further help State educational agencies (SEAs) and
others address the educational needs of migrant children. These
include:
MEP Consortium Incentive Grants (CIGs),
High School Equivalency Program (HEP),
College Assistance Program (CAMP), and
Binational Migrant Education Initiative (BMEI).
10
Overview of Grants and Special Initiatives
In addition to funding the MEP, OME currently supports four other
programs or initiatives to support the education of migrant children.
MEP Consortium
Incentive Grants
College
Assistance
Migrant Program
High School
Equivalency
Program
Binational
Migrant
Education
Initiative
11
Check-in
How much do you know about the MEP supplemental programs /
initiatives, and whether any of them operate in your state?
See QRRS 13.1 MEP Supplemental Grants and Special Initiatives in Your
State
12

Section 3: Consortium Incentive Grants (CIGs)

Consortium Incentive Grants
(CIGs)
13
Consortium Incentive Grants
On an annual basis, the U.S. Department of Education reserves up to
$3 million of the MEP appropriation to award grants to SEAs to
participate in high quality consortia that improve the interstate or
intrastate coordination of migrant education programs by addressing
key needs of migratory children who have their education interrupted.
14
Sections 1303(d) and 1308(d) of Title I,
Part C of ESEA, as amended
Consortium Incentive Grants
Each SEA may enter into a consortium with one or more other SEA or
entity and apply for special funding based on their proposal to
implement one or more services for migrant children whose education
has been interrupted. These proposed activities must be:
Conform to one of the absolute priorities the Department established
and identified as defined in the Notice Inviting Applications (NIA), and
Based on scientifically-based research strategies.
Grants to consortia of SEAs are awarded competitively. Awarded
amounts are additional funds the SEA may use under the MEP for any
operational activities.
15
For more information about Consortium Incentive Grants, visit the ED website.

Section 4: High School Equivalency Program (HEP) and College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) Grants

High School
Equivalency Program
(HEP) and
College Assistance
Migrant Program
(CAMP) Grants
16
In This Section
High School Equivalency Program
College Assistance Migrant
Programs
High School Equivalency Program
HEP is designed to help migratory and seasonal farmworkers and
members of their immediate families who are 16 years of age or older,
to obtain the equivalent of a secondary school diploma and
subsequently, to gain employment in a career position or the military or
entry into postsecondary education.
Higher Education Act (HEA) Title IV, Sec. 418A
Higher Education Opportunity Act P.L. 110-135. Sec. 408
17
High School Equivalency Program
The HEP is administered through OME as a discretionary competitive
grant program authorized in the Higher Education Act.
HEP grants are awarded for up to five years.
View the RFP for the current award period at:
http://www2.ed.gov/programs/hep/index.html.
While most HEP programs are located at Institutions of Higher
Education (IHEs), non-profit organizations are also eligible to apply in
conjunction with an IHE.
18
High School Equivalency Program
HEP participants receive developmental instruction, counseling, and
other services intended to prepare them to:
Complete the requirements for high school graduation or for high
school equivalency certificates,
Pass standardized tests of high school equivalency, and
Be placed in the first year of college or university or a career (including
the military).
19
High School Equivalency Program
Some of the support services that may be offered through HEP include:
Counseling,
Job placement,
Health care,
Financial aid stipends,
Housing for residential students, and
Cultural and academic programs.
20
For more information about HEP projects, visit the ED website.
College Assistance Migrant Programs
CAMP is administered through the OME as a five year discretionary
competitive grant program also authorized in the Higher Education Act.
CAMP grants are awarded for up to five years.
View the RFP for the current award period at:
http://www2.ed.gov/programs/camp/index.html
While most CAMP programs are located at IHEs, non-profit
organizations are also eligible to apply.
21
College Assistance Migrant Programs
The purpose of CAMP is to provide the academic and financial support
necessary to help migrant and seasonal farmworkers and members of
their immediate family successfully complete their first year of college
and continue in postsecondary education.
Higher Education Act (HEA) Title IV, Sec. 418A
Higher Education Opportunity Act P.L. 110-315, Sec. 408
22
College Assistance Migrant Programs
Some of the support services that may be offered through CAMP
include
Outreach to eligible migrant
and seasonal farmworkers,
Counseling,
Tutoring,
Skills workshops,
Health services,
Financial aid stipends,
Housing assistance for eligible
students during their first year
of college, and
Limited follow-up services
after their first year of
postsecondary education.
For more information about CAMP and future grant competitions, visit the ED website.
23
Check-in
Are there resources from the MEP supplemental grants that you can
leverage to enhance activities and services for migrant students in your
state?
24
See QRRS 13.2 Leverage Resources Offered through MEP Supplemental
Grants

Section 5: Binational Migrant Education Initiative (BMEI)

Binational Migrant
Education Initiative
(BMEI)
25
In This Section
Overview
Who is a Binational Student?
Challenges of Binational Students
Access to Schools Transfer Document
Teacher Exchange Program
Information and Dissemination
Free Textbook Distribution
Strategies for Assisting Binational
Students
Binational Migrant Education Initiative
Overview
The Binational Migrant Education Initiative (BMEI) grew out of the work
of a group from California who, in 1976, initiated efforts to work with
Mexico on issues related to the education of students who migrate
between California and Mexico.
These efforts resulted in the creation of the California Binational
Program.
Thereafter, other border states became involved, giving birth to the
Binational Migrant Education Program (BMEP).
o Now named the Binational Migrant Education Initiative (BMEI).
26
With approximately 27 U.S. states and 31 Mexican states participating
to some degree in the BMEI, OME has had an increasing role in the
coordination of activities among U.S. states engaged in programs with
Mexican states to improve continuity of educational and social
services for migrant students who migrate between the two countries.
27
Binational Migrant Education Initiative
Overview
Binational Migrant Education Initiative
Overview
The Department of Education’s specific objectives through OME’s
involvement with the BMEI are:
To support and strengthen the efforts of states participating in the
U.S. BMEI through the interstate coordination of programs,
To support a continuing dialogue and sharing of information among
educators of migrant students in the U.S. and Mexico, and
To contribute to and promote the implementation of binational
cooperation in the field of education within the context of the United
State-Mexico Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Education.
28
Who is a Binational Student?
A binational student is an eligible migrant student who has moved
between Mexico and the United States with his/her parents or as an
emancipated youth at least once in the last 36 months.
29
Challenges of Binational Students
In addition to the challenges that migrant students experience,
binational students face:
Social and cultural confusion traveling between two countries,
Loss of a sense of belonging,
Improper placement due to variances in requirements among
educational systems, and
High drop-out rates.
30
Access to Schools Transfer Document
Binational students may arrive to enroll in American schools without
proper academic documentation and without the English skills to
communicate their progress in school. This often results in improper
placement of students, as they may be placed according to age, rather
than equivalent grade level in the Mexican school system.
31
Access to Schools Transfer Document
The graphic below illustrates the grade/coursework structure for
children in the Mexican school system.
Terrazas, A. and Fix, M. (2009). The Binational Option: Meeting the Instructional Needs of
Limited English Proficient Students. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute.
Retrieved from: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/pubs/TeacherExchange-Nov09.pdf
32
Access to Schools Transfer Document
Schools can request a Transfer Document issued by the Mexican
Consulate, which facilitates the enrollment and proper placement of
students traveling between both countries.
The Transfer Document includes information related to grades and
courses completed, academic performance, and health information.
It also serves as a binational report card for binational migrant
students.
33
Access to Schools Transfer Document
There are separate documents for students in grades 1- 6 (Primaria)
and grades 7-9 (Secundiaria).
There is not a Transfer Document for students in grades 10-12; rather,
transcripts need the authorization of an apostille from the state’s
Secretary of State.
o A sample apostille request letter can be viewed at
http://www.semy.org/publications/Ltr_to_Request_Issuance_of_A
postille_022210.pdf
34
Access to Schools Transfer Document
If a migrant student returning to Mexico did not arrive with a Transfer
Document, and one was not obtained, the U.S. school should issue a
Transfer Document to the student before leaving in order to facilitate
their re-entry into the Mexican school system. The Transfer Document:
Is usually filled out by the school registrar, guidance counselor or
secretary and the student’s teacher; and
Requires information regarding:
o Student information, including Mexican registration number,
parents’ or guardians’ names, etc.,
o School information, and
o Student performance data, including grades and notes about
learning.
35
Access to Schools Transfer Document
Blank Transfer Documents are distributed by the Mexican Consulate in
the state.
o Each document has a unique number.
o Schools should plan to keep a supply on hand to avoid delays
when a student or parent of a migrant student requests one.
o Recruiters should consider having some Transfer Documents on
hand as well.
36
Access to Schools Transfer Document
However, obtaining a Transfer Document can take time. The systems in
place for requesting and transmitting Transfer Documents vary greatly
depending on the Mexican state.
Understand the process for obtaining Transfer Documents from the
Mexican states from which students most frequently arrive to
determine the most expeditious means.
o Understand what system is used in each state (e.g., mail, fax,
electronic).
o Be prepared to make multiple requests if necessary.
o Be proactive.
o If all else fails, contact your MEP office.
37
Teacher Exchange Program
The Teacher Exchange Program supports teachers who spend time
learning and sharing their expertise about the cultural, educational, and
social experiences of the binational migrant student.
Rather than merely addressing the educational needs of one child
through telephone consultation or sending textbooks and assignments,
teacher exchange programs enhance overall understanding of
educational practices, requirements, and expectations among
participating nations’ educators and policymakers.
38
Teacher Exchange Program
Most teacher exchanges take place during the summer months.
Individual SEAs and the Mexican Consulate in their states work
together to establish procedures and processes for teacher exchange.
o In some cases, SEAs work directly with Mexican states.
The planning process is lengthy and begins early during the prior
school year.
In addition to the application process to match expertise and interest,
planning the logistics of school placement, travel, housing and meals,
etc., is extensive and requires attention to many details.
39
Teacher Exchange Program
The MEP Binational Migrant Teacher Exchange Program consists of two
components:
1. Teachers travel from Mexico during the summer months for 3-8
weeks and are typically placed in schools with significant numbers of
binational migrant students or in areas where few bilingual teachers
are available to work with the binational migrant students; and
2. U.S. teachers travel to Mexico during the summer, typically for one or
two weeks to visit schools and communities.
40
Teacher Exchange Program
Requirements for a U.S. teacher to participate in the exchange typically
include:
Being a teacher of bilingual or migrant programs,
Knowledge of the educational problems of binational children in the U.S.,
Willingness to cooperate with Mexico in exchanging teaching methods and
educational technology,
A level of Spanish that allows verbal communication without a translator,
An ability to explain the American educational system and local district
system, and
Interest in learning about the communities of origin of the Mexican migrants.
41
Teacher Exchange Program
For a Mexican teacher to participate, he or she must typically have:
A bachelor’s degree in the area of pedagogy/certificate-diploma from the
Normal School or Upper Normal School;
A minimum three years of classroom experience as a group teacher;
A certain mastery of the English language that permits verbal communication;
Knowledge of the educational problems of the Mexican rural environment;
General knowledge of the Mexican educational system;
Knowledge of Mexico’s history, traditions, and culture; and
Experience in designing educational programs and materials.
42
Teacher Exchange Program
Binational students benefit from exchanges in many ways:
Visiting Mexican teachers bring a sense of home culture to the
classroom.
Students receive additional assistance in learning with someone
fluent in their native language.
Teachers gain a better understanding of the Mexican education
systems and curriculum.
Teachers experiencing a new culture and language can empathize
with migrant students’ experiences.
43
Teacher Exchange Program
The planning process for a Teacher Exchange Program is an extensive
process that should begin well in advance (7-9 months) of the teachers’
arrival at his/her intended destinations. Consider that:
Applications must be submitted, both by interested program
administrators and potential exchange teachers;
Areas of program need and teacher expertise must be matched;
Housing, transportation, and meal plans must be arranged;
Passports and Visas must be obtained; and
Medical and other personal arrangements need to be addressed.
For more comprehensive information on planning for a Binational Teacher Exchange, see
The Binational Migrant Education Teacher Exchange Program.
44
Information and Dissemination Free Textbook
Distribution
Through an agreement with Mexico, textbooks are distributed to
binational migrant education programs in the U.S. to supplement the
curricula used for the education of monolingual Spanish speaking
students and help promote literacy development in Spanish.
Textbooks are typically available for Primaria, grades 1-6.
Each state must coordinate the distribution of free textbooks through
its Mexican consulate.
o While Mexico provides the books, the states are responsible for
the arrangement of delivery and associated costs.
45
Information and Dissemination Free Textbook
Distribution
Distribution of Mexican textbooks benefits binational students by:
Allowing monolingual students to demonstrate content knowledge,
Providing a continuum of curriculum from Mexico,
Supplementing literacy programs with students,
Infusing culture and history of Mexico, and
Involving parents through familiarity of curriculum.
46
Strategies for Assisting Binational Students
States with large populations of eligible binational migrant students
might consider strategies to:
Work with Mexican states of origin to align curriculum descriptions;
Make available courses through distance learning options, especially
for secondary students to obtain credit accruals;
Ensure that students returning to Mexico have a completed Transfer
Document (if grades 1-9) or an Apostille (if grades 10-12);
Allow students to take end-of-grade assessments early if leaving near,
but prior to, the end of the school year;
Identify when students typically return to Mexico--
o So that assessments can be issued and Transfer Documents made
available.
47
Strategies for Assisting Binational Students
States with large populations of eligible binational migrant students
might consider strategies to (continued):
Participate in the Free Textbook Distribution program;
Facilitate enrollment in ESL classes as necessary;
Communicate with parents concerning school records and school
schedules;
o Give exiting students or parents a copy of their MSIX record. This WILL
NOT replace the requirement for a Transfer Document but the Mexican
schools can use the MSIX record as a part of the student’s personal
education portfolio. Having the parents retain a copy also and may be
useful so that, upon the child’s re-entry into the U.S. school system, the
LEA that enrolls the child may quickly identify the student’s MSIX records
and past enrollment history.
48
Strategies for Assisting Binational Students
States with large populations of eligible binational migrant students
might consider strategies to (continued):
Promote understanding of Mexico’s culture and educational systems
by encouraging teacher exchange; and
Provide professional development on cultural sensitivities and special
challenges that binational students face.
49
What Do You Think?
Considering the added challenges that binational students face, can
you think of four strategies that can ease some of the educational
challenges of these students?
1.
2.
3.
4.
50
What Do You Think? Reflection
In listing strategies for easing the challenges of Binational students, did
you include?
1. Ensuring protocols are in place for requesting Transfer Documents
for students who regularly travel between the United States and
Mexico.
2. Working with Mexican states of origin to align curriculum
descriptions.
3. Providing professional development on cultural sensitivities and
special challenges that binational students face.
4. Contacting the Mexican Consulate to request free textbooks for
binational students.
51
Check-in
What has been the five-year trend for binational students entering
your state?
From what states in Mexico do binational students most frequently
arrive?
What is the typical length of stay of binational students in your State?
See QRRS 13.3 Binational Migrant Trends in Your State
52

Section 6: Wrapping Up

Wrapping Up
In This Section
Key Concepts
Action Planning
Resources
53
Key Concepts
In addition to the administration of the MEP, the OME administers
several grants, and participates in special initiatives to further support
the educational needs of migrant children.
The CIG program provides grants to SEA consortia that improve the
interstate or intrastate coordination of migrant education programs by
addressing key needs of migratory children.
54
Key Concepts
The HEP program is designed to assist eligible individuals interested
in completing a secondary school equivalency diploma and then
enrolling in a college or university, or in a career.
CAMP provides assistance to eligible students attending their first year
of postsecondary education.
Binational migrant children face added educational challenges
caused by traveling between two countries and differences in
educational systems.
55
Action Planning
Consider the following questions.
Based on the past five-year migrant trends in your state, what
additional services and resources do you anticipate needing?
What services and resources available through these programs can
be leveraged for pre-K-12 migrant students?
What policy changes or new strategies can be implemented to
leverage the BMEI programs?
Are there additional funding opportunities my state should pursue?
Add any actionable items to your MEP planning calendar.
See QRRS 13.4 Grants and Special Initiatives Action
56
Resources for Grants and Special Initiatives
MEP Guidance on the Education of Migratory Children under Title I,
Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 III
Explanation of guidelines to implement the laws and regulations
The Binational Migrant Education Teacher Exchange Program A
guide to supporting “education without borders”
MEP Consortium Incentive Grants (CIG) Link to current CIG projects
High School Equivalency Program (HEP) Link to current HEP projects
and contacts
College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) Link to current CAMP
projects and contacts
57
Migrant Education Program Resources
MEP Officers List of OME contact information
(https://results.ed.gov/about/contact)
Glossary of Terms Alphabetical listing of key terms applicable to
migrant education (https://results.ed.gov/idr-
manual/section/glossary/glossary)
58