Skip to main content

Tools & Curriculum

Return to Tools & Curriculum

CNA Toolkit

Select a main section below to review. Then select the chapter and sub-section to view.

Section A: Introduction and Overview

A.1 About This Toolkit

The Service Delivery Plan Toolkit is the second in a series of three toolkits that have been developed by the Office of Migrant Education (OME) as a resource for States as they develop their migrant-specific comprehensive plans for service delivery, commonly known as a service delivery plan (SDP). This version of the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit (Toolkit) updates the information and resources according to the changes made to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) through the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA).

Other toolkits in the series include the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit and the Program Evaluation Toolkit. Taken together, these three toolkits provide a guide for a Continuous Improvement Cycle of program planning, implementation, and evaluation aligned with the current needs and priorities of migratory children and families in the state. The purpose of this Toolkit is to provide you, as the Migrant Education Program (MEP) State Director, with information, guidance, and resources for developing an effective SDP. This Toolkit presents information pertaining to relevant federal legislation and guidance as well as information and specific suggestions to help with the development, use, and dissemination of an SDP.

In accordance with the MEP Non-Regulatory Guidance (guidance), this Toolkit is designed to support a collaborative planning process informed directly by the Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) and can serve as a blueprint for State Directors to plan, implement, and improve services for migratory children, according to their unique needs as identified by the statewide CNA. State MEPs vary widely in size, structure, and children served. This Toolkit offers suggestions and recommendations to help State Directors, including those in small states or states with summer-only programs, create a plan that improves the state’s efforts in working with migratory children and families. In addition, this Toolkit provides suggestions for ways to ensure that local projects receive assistance with and are held accountable for implementing the SDP.

A.2 The SDP and the Continuous Improvement Cycle

In accordance with ESEA, as amended, State education agencies (SEAs) are required to submit to the U.S. Department of Education in their Consolidated State Plan the long-term goals and measurements of interim progress that are designed to improve the academic achievement of all children in their State.

Additionally, States are required by ESEA to develop a migrant-specific plan that will assist migratory children make progress toward achievement of the State’s long-term goals and measurements of interim progress. This plan, known as the Service Delivery Plan (SDP), outlines the delivery and evaluation of the services provided to migratory children through their MEP. The SDP is developed from the results of an up-to-date statewide CNA.

The SDP is a comprehensive plan that describes the services the SEA will provide directly or through local operating agencies (LOAs) to meet the unique needs of migratory children; in other words, it is the SEA’s operational plan for the MEP.

The development of the SDP takes places as part of a Continuous Improvement Cycle, as depicted in Figure A.1. In this cycle, each step in developing a program, assessing needs, identifying strategies, implementing strategies, and evaluating results, builds on the previous activity and informs the subsequent activity.

Undertaking the SDP initiates a process in which the State Director enlists the input of a planning team and/or stakeholders to review and refine the solution strategies outlined in the CNA, to finalize solution strategies to be implemented, and, for those chosen solution strategies, design measurable program outcomes (MPOs) that are aimed at helping migratory children achieve the State’s measurements of interim progress.

Figure A.1 Continuous Improvement Cycle

As depicted in Figure A.1, the CNA is the start of the Continuous Improvement Cycle, providing the MEP with insight about the current needs of the state’s migratory children, and allows the MEP to determine or update priorities. The CNA itself typically follows from the evaluation of the implementation of the MEP and the results achieved by the MEP against the State’s measurements of interim progress, particularly for those children who have priority for services as defined in section 1304(c) of the ESEA. Through the continuous improvement process the MEP can revise and refine its service delivery to better align needs, strategies and MPOs to ensure that adopted strategies are effectively helping migratory children to make progress toward the State’s measurements of interim progress.

Using the CNA as a starting point, this Toolkit guides State Directors through the process of using the results from the CNA to develop their SDP, which forms the basis for delivering comprehensive services to migratory children and their families. The State Director, with assistance from a planning team or other stakeholders and experts, reviews the solution strategies proposed in the CNA and then develops MPOs, which are the foundation for determining the direction of the MEP and establishing accountability. The State Director and planning team will then develop and use evaluation questions to determine the extent to which MPOs are achieved and to which the SDP is implemented. The goal of the SDP is to ensure that migratory children receive full and appropriate opportunities to meet the same challenging State academic standards that all children are expected to meet.

You may want to consult Terms and Definitions Related to the MEP Comprehensive Needs Assessment, Service Delivery Plan, and Program Evaluation, the glossary of important terms and definitions related to the various stages of this cycle.

A.3 The Consolidated State Plan and the SDP

The Consolidated State Plan is a single application that States use to apply for funds under the ESEA programs in which the State participates, including funding for Title I, Part C – Education of Migratory Children. The Department of Education reviews and approves the plan, at the beginning of each reauthorization period.

The Consolidated State Plan contains an outline of what the State will take into consideration when developing its services for migratory children, while the SDP contains the specifics related to their delivery to this population. The SDP is the SEA’s operational plan for the MEP. It is the primary tool for designing and communicating the direction of the program. The SEA does not submit the SDP to the Department of Education, but rather makes the plan available for review by departmental staff and disseminates it to all LOAs, parent groups, and other interested parties. The SEA is required to ensure that its LOAs comply with the plan.

A.4 Organization of the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit

This Toolkit consists of eight sections, beginning with this Introduction and Overview (Section A).

Section B, Overview of Statute, Regulations and Non-Regulatory Guidance Related to Service Delivery Plans, reviews the legislative mandate (Title I, Part C of the ESEA, as amended), regulations related to the SDP, and the MEP Non-Regulatory Guidance governing the development of the SDP and required components.

Section C, Planning and Documenting the SDP, features a collaborative planning process for the SDP and provides suggestions for identifying members of a planning team, conducting meetings, and obtaining input and assistance needed to develop a plan that is reflective of a wide range of expertise and experience in migrant education. This section also introduces a logic model and provides a suggested organization for the written SDP.

Section D, The General Framework of the SDP, focuses on the general SDP framework. It includes suggestions for reviewing and summarizing the CNA, selecting service delivery strategies, establishing MPOs, and developing evaluation questions. This section also assists with developing a project plan to put strategies into operation.

Section E, Addressing the Needs of Migratory Children, reviews requirements for addressing the needs of specific subgroups of migratory children and youth, including preschool migratory children, migratory youth who have dropped out of school and the recommended inclusion of migratory children who have been identified under the Priority for Services (PFS) provision.

Section F, The Role of Parents in Migratory Children’s Education, reviews the requirements related to involvement of migratory parents in the development of the SDP (34 C.F.R. § 200.83(b)).

Section G, Sharing, Using and Updating the SDP, presents communications strategies for collecting stakeholder feedback on the SDP and communicating the plan to leaders of local projects and other stakeholders. It also suggests an approach for the periodic review of data with stakeholders to support continuous improvement and to build or maintain collaborations.

Section H, Engaging and Supporting Local Projects, presents information on the State MEP’s role in local program accountability and examines ways to assist local programs in SDP implementation. Specific topics include local project monitoring, provision of sub-grants, communication, and technical assistance.

Each section includes tools (such as planning templates) and resources (such as recommendations for planning meeting topics) to support the SDP planning process.

A.5 Key Recommendations for Using the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit

We recommend that you, as the State Director, review this Toolkit before developing or updating the SDP. A thoughtful and systematic development of the State’s SDP will result in a clear and comprehensive plan that connects needs, state performance goals, MPOs, and strategies in a way that can potentially increase the performance of migratory children, particularly those most at risk of academic failure and dropping out of school.

State MEPs can vary widely depending on the demographics of the children they serve, the types of migratory programs in place, and program size. Because State Directors possess a broad range of experience and expertise in migrant education and in program planning, assessing their expertise and that of others who may be assisting with the SDP planning process can help determine how best to use this Toolkit, whether by applying the steps as a complete process or by using only some sections and tools as needed.

Please note that this Toolkit provides only suggestions and recommendations for developing the SDP. While the State MEP must develop an SDP, and there are some elements required for statutory compliance, the specific format presented in this Toolkit is not required. This Toolkit highlights any required elements or approaches, but otherwise the information should only be considered as recommendations for organizing and developing the SDP.

A.6 How to Adapt the Process for Small States and Summer-Only Programs

This Toolkit is directed toward State MEPs that have the capacity for convening teams to carry out the process and to enlist the support of state education agency staff or consultants. Involvement in SDP development at this level may not be practical for small states. Therefore, State Directors of small states may consider ways to scale down the activities in the process to meet their needs, while still developing a quality SDP. Suggestions for scaling activities and making use of resources to efficiently develop an SDP are presented throughout this Toolkit.

Similarly, States with summer-only migrant programs may have different needs from States serving migratory children during the traditional school year. Some sections of this Toolkit present suggestions for states with summer-only migrant programs.

Service Delivery Plan: Process Overview

Table A.1 Service Delivery Plan: Process Overview

Actions

Recommended Activities

Outcomes

Personnel

PRE-PLANNING PHASE

Reviewing Information to Inform the Process

  • Review relevant information that will inform the scale and focus of your SDP planning effort, including the following:
    • current requirements for the SDP
    • this Toolkit
    • results of the CNA
    • recent MEP evaluation results, if available
    • previous SDP and any related stakeholder feedback
    • consultation with PAC /migratory parents
  • Identify and recruit Management Team members
  • Draft an outline of your SDP
  • List of Management Team members
  • Proposed SDP Outline

State Director

Planning the SDP Development Process

  • Develop a timeline for developing the SDP which will support a collaborative process.
  • Identify SDP Planning Team members.
  • Develop a schedule of meetings, establish purpose and goals of each meeting, and set agenda items.
  • Develop a system for collecting information generated throughout the planning process.
  • SDP Development Timeline
  • List of SDP Planning Team members
  • Meeting schedule and draft agendas

State Director; Management Team

SDP DEVELOPMENT PHASE

Launching the Planning Process

  • Orient the SDP Planning team to the SDP purpose; the planning process; and results of the CNA and MEP evaluation.
  • Ensure the SDP Planning team understands the unique needs of migratory children identified to receive priority for services, preschool migratory children, and migratory children who have dropped out of school.
  • Gather additional details about migratory children in the state, including root causes of concerns, based on the perspectives of SDP Planning Team members.
  • Review the solution strategies proposed in the CNA; consider implementation challenges and identify additional strategies.
  • Additional information on migratory children in your state to supplement the CNA and MEP evaluation
  • List of solution strategies finalized from the proposed strategies in the CNA with recommendations for implementation

State Director; SDP Planning Team

Developing Aligned Components

  • Completed alignment chart
  • Completed project plan

State Director; SDP Planning Team

Addressing the Needs of Migratory Children

  • Develop strategies and plans to include the following required and suggested SDP elements:
    • Addressing the needs of migratory children identified to receive PFS (information is suggested for the SDP)
    • Addressing the needs of preschool migratory children and migratory youth who have dropped out of school (information is required for the SDP)
    • Identification and Recruitment (ID&R) of migratory children (suggested to include in the SDP)
    • Exchange of student records (suggested to include in the SDP)
    • Consultation with the State Parent Advisory Council (PAC) or with migratory parents for SEAs not operating programs for one school year in duration (required for the SDP)
  • Draft strategies and plans for required and suggested elements of the SDP

State Director; SDP Planning Team

Planning local monitoring and support

Based on the SDP, develop strategies to ensure implementation and accountability in local projects which can be included in the SDP.

Plans for the following:

  • Communication with local projects
  • Technical assistance and training
  • Local subgranting processes
  • Local monitoring

State Director; SDP Planning Team

Creating the SDP

  • Develop a project plan with activities, timeline, persons or agencies responsible, and resources to operationalize the strategies.
  • Compile the information developed throughout the planning process and, using the draft outline developed during the pre-planning phase, draft the SDP.
  • Gather feedback on the draft SDP from various stakeholder groups and revise the SDP based on their review.
  • Project plan
  • Draft SDP
  • Stakeholder feedback on the draft SDP
  • Final SDP

State Director; SDP Planning Team

SDP Dissemination and Review

Planning for engagement

  • Develop a plan for “Looking Forward” that includes how to communicate the SDP and create buy-in, revisit the Plan to keep it relevant, and build and maintain collaborations.
  • Plan for “Looking Forward”

State Director; SDP Planning Team

Sharing, Using, and Updating the SDP

  • Communicate the SDP and begin implementation, according to plans.
  • Gather feedback from stakeholders on the SDP as part of the Continuous Improvement Process.
  • Stakeholder feedback on the effectiveness of the SDP to improve outcomes for migratory children

State Director; MEP staff; local operating agencies; migratory parents

Section C: Planning and Documenting the Service Delivery Plan

Section C: Overview

Once you, as the State Director, have conducted the Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA), you should begin developing the Service Delivery Plan (SDP) for your State. The information and resources presented in this section can support you as you plan the process for developing or revising your SDP. This structured planning process can help promote collaboration with the various agencies and stakeholder groups that are involved in serving migratory children.

C.1. From CNA to the SDP

C.2 Applying Logic Model Thinking

C.3 Documentation of the SDP

C.1. From CNA to the SDP

The SDP Planning Process: Overview

Developing the SDP is a complex process of gathering information, involving stakeholders, and detailing specific components of the plan. We encourage you to spend time at the beginning on planning the process. The effort spent organizing your procedures will save you time later and ensure that all tasks will be completed effectively. If you followed the guidance in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit, you likely have much of the structure in place to support an effective SDP planning process. You may also find it helpful and effective to engage members of the CNA management and planning teams on the SDP. Further recommendations for organizing the SDP planning process follow.

Establish a Management Team

We encourage you to establish your own SDP management team or continue working with the CNA management team. The management team is a small core group, smaller than the SDP Planning Team, who will support you throughout the planning and the writing of the SDP. A management team can assist with the following:

  • Planning and facilitating meetings
  • Compiling information from the meetings that can be used for writing the SDP
  • Writing the SDP
  • Communicating the plan to stakeholders

You might want to consider the following skills and knowledge for management team members:

  • Experience planning and facilitating meetings
  • Ability to organize and archive information
  • Strong writing skills
  • Understanding of the Migrant Education Program (MEP), at both state and local levels
  • Experience in program planning

You may want to include the MEP Evaluator since he/she will play a key role in the transition from the SDP (detailed in this Toolkit) to the evaluation of the MEP and its implementation (detailed in the Program Evaluation Toolkit). The Measurable Program Outcomes (MPOs) for program strategies and the evaluation questions that are developed as part of the SDP (described in Section D.4 of this Toolkit) become the foundation of the MEP evaluation; therefore, having the MEP Evaluator involved in developing the SDP can help ensure that the Evaluation Plan is well aligned with the SDP.

Review CNA Results

The results of the CNA are the natural starting point for developing the SDP. If the CNA planning process followed the steps outlined in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit, you should have a wealth of information, including a set of prioritized needs, recommended solution strategies that are grounded in research and evidence of effectiveness, and MPOs. Reviewing summaries and reports developed in the CNA process can help ensure that the services and strategies adopted in the SDP stem from the CNA results and any previous evaluation conducted as part of the Continuous Improvement Cycle that is in place. (See Section A: Introduction and Overview for a description of the Continuous Improvement Cycle.)

Establish an SDP Planning Team

A planning team can play an instrumental role in guiding the development of the SDP. You may want to include members of the Needs Assessment Committee (NAC) that conducted the CNA to ensure continuity of the planning process. For information on and recommendations for identifying team members, preparing them to participate in a collaborative process, and conducting group activities, see Steps 1 and 2 of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit.

Determine Number of and Purpose for Planning Team Meetings

At the outset of the planning process, you should determine what you would like the SDP Planning Team to accomplish and how many meetings will be needed for the tasks. We encourage you to review the “big picture” of the SDP planning process in Section A: Introduction and Overview and specifically Developing the Service Delivery Plan: Process Overview.

A suggestion for how to organize the planning process can be found in Suggested SDP Planning Meetings, which presents how you might plan the work of the SDP Planning Team around four meetings. While that summary of recommended meetings describes what would likely be day-long or two-day on-site meetings, you may choose to have a series of short meetings that take place electronically or by conference call, or a combination of planning team meetings on-site and work group meetings that take place electronically or by conference call.

The development of the SDP is best conducted as a collaborative process that engages and calls upon the knowledge and experience of various stakeholders. A collaborative planning process that includes a range of stakeholders, such as educators, administrators, service providers, and parents of migratory children, can

  • bring a range of expertise and experience to the process;
  • increase stakeholder buy-in, as various role groups are brought to the table; and
  • identify opportunities for coordination among local, state, and federal programs.

You may want to work with a similar planning team as was used to conduct the CNA. Remember that you have the flexibility to determine what type of collaboration is most appropriate for your state context and adapt the recommendations provided in this Toolkit as appropriate.

Key Activities of the SDP Planning Team

To identify appropriate members, review the general tasks of the SDP Planning Team below.

Specifically, the SDP Planning Team should undertake the following tasks:

  • Review the performance of migratory children against state performance goals and targets.
    • Review state performance goals and targets in the Consolidated State Plan.
    • Review the CNA and MEP evaluation report, and contribute any additional insights on the needs of migratory children in the state.
    • Review gaps in performance between migratory children, including pre-school migratory children and migratory children who have dropped out of school. You may also want to include those children identified to receive priority for services (PFS), and other significant subpopulations of migratory children in the state.
  • Provide input on the development of an SDP that is aligned and implementable.
    • Select strategies that have been identified in the CNA.
    • Establish MPOs for the strategies.
    • Develop questions for the Evaluation Plan.
    • Develop a project plan with activities to put the strategies at the state and local level into action.
    • Develop recommendations for meeting needs of identified subpopulations of migratory children.
    • Ensure consultation by the State Parent Advisory Council (PAC) or by the parents of migratory children if the MEP operates projects of less than one school year of duration.
    • Include strategies for Identification & Recruitment (ID&R).
    • Include policies and guidelines for student records exchange for migratory children.
  • Ensure that the plan is implemented and remains relevant.
    • Develop recommendations and strategies to ensure local implementation.
    • Discuss ways to communicate the plan.
    • Discuss tasks and a timeline for reviewing formative evaluation data and updating the plan.

Considerations for Identifying SDP Planning Team Members

The composition of the SDP Planning Team will be unique to your State. There is a wide variation in the size and nature of the MEP in each state and the programs and agencies that serve migratory children. Many of the questions and considerations for identifying members of the NAC for the CNA will be relevant for identifying SDP Planning Team members (see Step 1 of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit). Additional questions to consider in building an effective SDP Planning Team include the following:

  • What programs and agencies are most involved in serving migratory children?
  • What areas of the state or what local programs (or types of local programs) should be represented?
  • What expertise and experience are critical for developing the SDP?
  • What perspectives should be represented in the SDP?
  • How will the State PAC or migrant parents be consulted in developing the SDP?
  • What individuals will be willing to devote significant time and effort to developing a quality plan?

The following are some suggested stakeholders and experts to include on the SDP Planning Team:

  • Members of the CNA committee
  • MEP Program Evaluator
  • Local migrant Project Directors
  • Representatives from other federal education programs (e.g., Homeless Education)
  • Migratory children
  • Community agencies that serve migratory families and children (e.g., Department of Health)
  • Teachers with experience in teaching migratory children
  • Early childhood educators (e.g., Head Start)
  • Drop-out prevention specialists
  • Representatives from institutions of higher education
  • State advocacy groups for migratory children and their families
  • Experts in content for state performance goal areas
  • English Language Acquisition experts

The Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit provides recommendations and resources related to the recruitment of NAC members that can be used for recruitment of SDP Planning Team members.

Using Work Groups

You may also consider convening work groups at strategic points in the SDP planning process. Work groups contain individuals charged with carrying out specific tasks in the SDP planning process. For example, you may want to convene a work group to develop MPOs for selected strategies or to develop the section of the SDP on parental involvement.

Work groups should include both those who are participating in the SDP planning process (to ensure continuity) and those from other programs and agencies (to provide external perspectives or to fill the gaps where additional expertise is warranted).

Work groups should be small and topic-focused. They may be established only for a short time to complete the task provided to them. You may consider establishing several work groups for one of the SDP Planning Team meetings that can work simultaneously and bring their efforts to the whole SDP Planning Team at the end of the meeting for review.

Considerations for Small States or Summer-Only Programs

If you have limited resources in your state, consider the following alternatives to an SDP Planning Team for keeping the process participatory:

  • Form a small core team (no more than eight members) of those most involved with MEP services to meet on a regular basis and a broader extended team that will meet occasionally. Members of the core team would be responsible for building on recommendations in the CNA, providing input on the various components of the SDP, and drafting the plan. A more extended team could include others who are important to the MEP and are available to provide support to the team, such as migratory parents or a representative from an institution of higher education.
  • In order to meet face-to-face without incurring significant costs, consider taking advantage of existing meetings, such as conferences, to convene the SDP Planning Team.
  • Use video and/or telephone conference calls to save on travel costs and to make meetings more convenient for team members.
  • In lieu of full meetings, identify key areas where you would like input, and identify the appropriate stakeholders to contact to discuss decisions and action items by phone.

Suggested Roles and Responsibilities of Planning Team Members (Reference)

The roles and responsibilities of those involved in developing the SDP will vary with the tasks assigned to each. As the State Director, you ultimately bear responsibility for the SDP and will plan the process and the work of the team and other stakeholders to get the input and expertise needed to develop a quality plan. Some team members will need to play a consistent role throughout the entire planning process while others may be called upon to assist with a particular portion of the plan, bringing unique expertise to the task at hand.

Table D.1 describes suggested roles of the State Director and SDP Planning Team in developing the SDP.

Table D.1 Roles and Responsibilities of SDP Planning Team Members

Title

Role and Responsibilities

State MEP Director, Management Team

  • Organize the SDP planning process (or oversee someone who will undertake these tasks).
  • Establish the planning team.
  • Manage coordination of the partners and working groups engaged in the planning process.
  • Plan meetings and provide notes on recommendations.
  • Maintain good communication across stakeholders.
  • Provide information from CNA, MEP evaluation, and the structure and operation of the MEP to SDP Planning Team members.
  • Ensure that the team is motivated and functional.
  • Establish deadlines and ensure that they are met.
  • Write the plan (or oversee the writing of the plan).
  • Plan for periodic review of implementation and update as needed.

SDP Team Members or Other Stakeholders

  • Become familiar with the CNA, MEP program evaluation, and all other background information provided for planning the SDP.
  • Provide expertise and experience that informs the planning process.
  • Participate in group discussions and activities.
  • Undertake specific tasks for the development of the SDP.
  • Review drafts.
  • Participate in periodic review of SDP implementation and provide input on updates.

Work Groups

  • Undertake specific tasks for the development of the SDP.
  • Bring specific expertise to a portion of the SDP planning process.
  • Be willing to meet at times other than in full SDP Planning Team meetings.

Suggested SDP Planning Meetings (Reference)

At the outset of the planning process, you should determine what you would like the SDP Planning Team to accomplish and how many meetings will be needed for the tasks. We encourage you to review the “big picture” of the SDP planning process in Section A: Introduction and Overview, specifically Developing the Service Delivery Plan: Process Overview.

Table D.2 provides an example of how you might plan the work of the SDP Planning Team around four meetings. While the table describes what would likely be day-long or two-day on-site meetings, you may choose to have a series of short meetings that take place electronically or by conference call, or a combination of planning team meetings on-site and work group meetings that take place electronically or by conference call.

Table D.2 Suggested SDP Planning Team Meetings’ Purposes and Outcomes

SDP Meeting

Purpose

Outcomes

Related Section of the Toolkit

#1

  • Orient the SDP Planning Team to the SDP purpose and planning process.
  • Familiarize the planning team with the MEP, CNA, and MEP evaluation.
  • Solicit additional information on what is known about migratory children and youth in the state (including root causes), based on perspectives of team members.
  • Review solution strategies proposed in the CNA; consider implementation challenges and strategies
  • Additional information on migratory children and youth in your state to supplement the CNA and MEP evaluation
  • List of solution strategies finalized from the proposed strategies in the CNA with recommendations for implementation

Section C

#2

Align components that are required in the SDP:

  • State performance targets
  • Needs assessment information
  • Service delivery strategies
  • MPOs
  • Evaluation Plan
  • Alignment chart
  • Project plan

Section D

#3

Develop strategies and plans for suggested sections on the following:

  • Addressing the needs of migratory children identified to receive PFS
  • ID&R
  • Parental involvement
  • Exchange of student records

Plans for suggested sections on the following:

  • Addressing the needs of migratory children identified to receive PFS
  • ID&R
  • Parental involvement
  • Exchange of student records

Sections F and G

#4

Develop strategies to ensure implementation and accountability in local projects

Plans for the following:

  • Communication with local projects
  • Technical assistance and training
  • Local granting processes
  • Local monitoring

Section H

SDP Planning Process Tasks and Timeline (Sample)

Tasks

Deadline [3]

Responsible Parties

Outcomes/Deliverables

Obtain permission to begin the SDP planning process from Federal Program Director

September 15

State Director, Federal Program Director

Written permission

Review requirements

September 20

State Director

List of requirements

Establish management team

September 30

State Director

List of management

team members

Meet with management team; plan the SDP planning process; identify potential SDP Planning Team members

October 1

State Director, management team

Task and timeline, list of potential SDP Planning Team members

Establish SDP Planning Team

October 15

State Director, management team

List of SDP Planning Team members

Conduct Meeting #1

November 1

State Director, management team

Input on proposed solutions in CNA

Finalize list of solution strategies

November 10

State Director

Final list of proposed solutions and strategies

Conduct Meeting #2

December 1

State Director, management team

Input on required elements of SDP and project plan

Finalize alignment chart and project plan

December 15

State Director

Finalized alignment chart and project plan

Invite specialists for work groups for Meeting #3

December 15

Management team

List of specialists

Conduct Meeting #3

January 15

State Director, management team

Input on plans for migratory children identified to receive PFS, parental involvement, ID&R, student records exchange

Review and summarize information generated in Meeting #3

February 1

State Director, management team

Plans for migratory children identified to receive PFS, parental involvement, ID&R, student records exchange

Conduct Meeting #4

February 15

State Director, management team

Input on plan for implementation in local projects

Develop technical assistance plan for LOAs

March 1

State Director, management team

Plan for technical assistance, training, granting, and monitoring

Write SDP

May 1

State Director, management team

Final draft

Conduct review

June 1

Management team

Stakeholder comments

Finalize SDP

July 1

State Director, management team

Final draft

Communicate the plan

July 15

State Director, management team

List of stakeholders and type of communication

3 Note that deadlines are offered as examples. The management team should set a schedule based on the specific circumstances of the state.

Recommendations for SDP Planning Meeting: Launching the SDP Planning Process

Recommendations for SDP Planning Meeting: Launching the SDP Planning Process

Once you have identified SDP Planning Team members, you should schedule the first meeting. This will be an important opportunity for team members to get to know one another and to understand the purpose and process of developing the SDP. This section provides recommendations to guide your planning meeting.

SDP Planning Team Meeting: Launching the SDP Planning Process

Purpose:

  • Orient the planning team to the SDP purpose and planning process.
  • Familiarize the planning team with the MEP, CNA, and MEP evaluation.
  • Solicit additional information on what is known about migratory children and youth in the state (including root causes), based on perspectives of team members.
  • Review solution strategies proposed in the CNA; consider implementation challenges and strategies.

Outcomes:

  • Additional information on migratory children and youth in your state to supplement the CNA and MEP evaluation
  • List of solution strategies finalized from the proposed strategies in the CNA with recommendations for implementation

Suggestions:

  • Provide ahead of time the meeting agenda, a summary of the CNA, and a summary of the MEP evaluation.
  • Spend time on introductions and perhaps a short activity for team members to get to know one another.
  • Have the CNA data leader and MEP evaluator present major findings on needs related to migratory children; ask the group to discuss the extent to which these align with their perspectives and if additional considerations should be included in the SDP. If you feel that greater exploration of root causes of the needs is warranted, facilitate a group process called “Five Whys Root Cause Analysis,” available in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit.
  • Provide information on the operation of the MEP, including the number of local projects.
  • Have the group complete a list of programs and agencies serving migratory children in the state to identify existing and potential partners and stakeholders to include in the SDP.
  • In small groups, grouped according to goal areas or needs, have team members discuss solution strategies from the CNA and provide input.
    • Will these solutions have an impact?
    • Should additional solutions or strategies be included?
    • What additional implementation challenges should be addressed?
    • How can they be addressed?
    • What common themes exist across needs and solutions?
  • Reach consensus on a final set of recommended solutions and strategies for the needs identified.
  • Debrief the day.

Follow up:

  • Finalize a list of solution strategies that will be included in the SDP.
  • Develop a summary of the implementation challenges for the strategies.
  • Keep the chart on programs and agencies serving migratory children on file.

Considerations for Small States

If you are not able to convene a large group for the first meeting, we encourage you to convene a small group of stakeholders to discuss the needs and solution strategies identified in the CNA and the progress of the MEP in the program evaluation. Another alternative is to convene small groups (focus groups) at one or two meetings where stakeholders are likely to attend, such as a state Title I conference, Parent Advisory Committee meeting, or school social workers conference. At the very least, consider conducting a series of phone interviews to gather input from a range of stakeholders. From the input you gather, you should develop a finalized list of solution strategies and implementation issues.

Alignment of the Parts: Overview

One of the key concepts to guide the SDP planning process is the alignment of all the various components that connect the state performance goals and targets with the strategies and MPOs you and the SDP Planning Team identify. While each of the components has its own function in the SDP, the components must be linked to provide a cohesive and consistent approach to enable migratory children to achieve the state performance goals and targets.

It is helpful to think of your state’s SDP in terms of a logic model. A logic model is a visual way to represent your plan systematically and articulate relationships among components. See the Service Delivery Plan Logic Model in Figure C.1.

Figure C.1 Service Delivery Plan Logic Model

Note the arrows that connect the boxes. What is fundamental to a logic model is “if-then” logic. When a logic model is developed, program planners should “test the logic” by reviewing each set of boxes connected by an arrow and ask “if-then” questions, that is, “If this condition or program component exists, then does the condition or program component to which it is connected logically follow?” Every box should be connected to another box. If there is a component that does not relate to the others, then the planners should question whether it should be in the model.

The MEP is accountable for enabling migratory children to perform at a level aligned with the State’s performance expectations for all children. Per Section 1301(3) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended, States must “ensure that migratory children receive full and appropriate opportunities to meet the same challenging State academic standards that all children are expected to meet.” Once strategies are selected to address the needs identified in the CNA, then the SDP Planning Team will develop MPOs to articulate what results you want to see for migratory children who participate in the MEP. The MPOs not only logically follow from the strategies, but they also should help migratory children achieve the state performance targets as well as other needs identified through the CNA.

If the strategies do not lead to improving migratory children’s performance related to state performance targets, then they need to be re-evaluated. If the strategies are thoughtfully selected and fully implemented, then the results should lead to achieving the MPOs. If the MEP achieves the MPOs, then in a well-conceived plan this will contribute to migratory children achieving the State’s performance goals.

The point to reinforce is that the MEP is tied into the State’s overall accountability system, as described in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. All strategies and activities are designed to provide the supports to migratory children to enable them to improve their academic performance.

C.3 Documentation of the SDP

Organizing and Archiving Information

As you meet with the SDP Planning Team and various stakeholders, you should keep thorough records of all conversations, meeting minutes, and group activities, and compile them for input in writing the plan. We recommend that you save as much information as possible electronically, creating files for each section of the SDP. Be sure to date all documents so that you will know which information is the most current. Note that the various charts and templates completed by the SDP Planning Team can be included in the SDP. Much of your work will be completed by the time you actually begin writing your SDP!

Contents of the Written SDP: Overview

In this section, you will find suggestions for what to include in each section of the SDP; this is not a prescribed format, but using it will help ensure you meet the statutory requirements for the SDP. In addition, you may want to review Suggested Table of Contents for the SDP, which you can use and customize to fit your SDP.

Executive Summary

An executive summary is usually the first section after the title page. It provides an opportunity for you to reinforce your state’s commitment to migrant education, feature the key needs of migratory children in the state, and introduce overall ways that the MEP plans to address these needs. Some state MEPs have a mission statement that should be included in this section. The executive summary is generally one to two pages long.

Introduction

  1. Legislative Mandate
    Summarizing the legislative mandate for SDPs will enable you to review requirements and will ensure your readers understand how the SDP is grounded in the law.
  2. Description of the State MEP
    A description of the organization of the MEP will provide the foundation for readers to understand how the implementation of the SDP will take place. Useful information will include the organization of the state program, local programs, and key collaborators. Visuals, such as an organizational chart or state map that shows number and location of programs, allow for vast amounts of information to be easily shared. If you developed this information to share with the SDP Planning Team at the beginning of the process, it should be ready to insert into the SDP.
  3. Description of the Planning Process
    A description of the planning process conveys a sense of commitment to a collaborative process and shows the range of experience and expertise that impacted the development of the SDP. Information in this section can be represented in lists and charts, enabling readers to quickly sense the process.

Consider including the following topics:

Body of the SDP

The main body of the SDP begins with the following required components: state performance targets, needs assessment, service delivery strategies, MPOs, and evaluation. While each of these components will need to be featured separately, the alignment chart that you will develop in Section E, Addressing the Needs of Migratory Children should be included to illustrate how each of the components relates to the others.

  1. General Framework — SDP Alignment
    • Performance Targets — List your State’s performance targets, since these were the starting point for the SDP.
    • Needs Assessment — Include a summary of the Need Statements developed in the CNA.
    • Service Delivery Strategies — List the strategies that were selected to address the needs.
    • MPOs — Include MPOs that articulate what you would like to see happen as a result of the implementation of the strategies.
    • Evaluation — Include evaluation questions for each MPO that reflect implementation and results. These will serve as the foundation for the development of the Evaluation Plan that is addressed in the Program Evaluation Toolkit.

Consider including a section that has the project plan with description of activities, programs, people carrying out the activities, a timeline, and resources needed.

  1. Project Plan
    The foundation for this section can be the project plan chart that you develop (see Project Planning Chart in Section D) that provides details on how the strategies in the SDP will be put into practice.

We recommend that the next four sections feature specialized topics for the SDP that will ensure that services are targeted and delivered efficiently.

  1. Migratory Children Identified to Receive Priority For Services
    This section should include your State’s process for identifying those migratory children most in need of services, including the criteria your state established for prioritizing these students for services and ways to ensure that services are directed toward meeting their unique needs.
  2. ID&R Plan
    This section should include the process and structure for the ID&R plan. You should address staffing as well as their training. In addition, you should discuss what types of accountability and quality assurance are in place to ensure that sound eligibility determinations are made.
  3. Parental Involvement Plan
    This section should include strategies that the State will implement to ensure that parents of migratory children are involved in the education of their children. The plan should include information on state and local migratory Parent Advisory Councils, supports for migratory parents, and resources.
  4. Exchange of Student Records
    This section should include how the MEP will establish (or review) policies and procedures for sending and receiving records for migratory children through intrastate and interstate transfer, Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX) policies and procedures, strategies for providing training and information on MSIX, strategies for cross-state collaboration, and ways your state student information system can assist with record transfer.

For the final two sections, include plans for the MEP to support local projects in implementing the SDP and holding them accountable.

  1. Implementation and Accountability in Local Programs
    This section should include the following:
    • Ways that the MEP will communicate with local programs to keep them informed about the SDP and to solicit feedback
    • A technical assistance plan to build the capacity of local operating agencies (LOAs) to plan and implement their programs
    • Strategies for ensuring that the local granting process requires applicants to implement the SDP
    • A plan for local monitoring, including specific indicators for which LOAs will be held accountable
  2. Looking Forward
    This section should include how you will communicate the SDP and ensure that it remains relevant. Topics to include are as follows:
    • Communicating the SDP to local projects
    • Communicating the SDP to other stakeholders
    • Reconvening the SDP Planning Team to review formative data and emerging issues and determine any needed changes in the SDP
    • Setting a target date for the next CNA and SDP process
    • Building and maintaining collaborations

Suggested Table of Contents for the SDP (Reference)

Download Suggested Table of Contents for the SDP

Executive Summary

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
    1. Legislative Mandate
    2. Description of the State Migrant Education Program
    3. Description of the Planning Process
      • Timeline
      • Planning Team Members
      • Planning Team Meetings (Purpose and Tasks)
  2. General Framework – SDP Alignment
    1. Performance Targets
    2. Needs Assessment
    3. Service Delivery Strategies
    4. Measurable Program Outcomes
    5. Evaluation
  3. Project Plan
  4. Migratory Children Identified to Receive Priority for Services
  5. Identification & Recruitment Plan
  6. Parental Involvement Plan
  7. Student Records Exchange/Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX) Usage Plan
  8. Implementation and Accountability in Local Programs
    1. Local-level Communication
    2. Local-level Professional Development and Technical Assistance
    3. Sub-granting Process
    4. Monitoring and Accountability
  9. Looking Forward
    1. Communicating the SDP to Local Projects
    2. Communicating the SDP to Other Stakeholders
    3. Reconvening the Planning Team to Review Formative Data and Emerging Issues and Determine Changes Needed in the SDP
    4. Setting a Target Date for the Next Comprehensive Needs Assessment and Service Delivery Plan Process
    5. Building and Maintaining Collaboration

Section D: The General Framework of the Service Delivery Plan

Section D: Overview

This section of the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit defines each component of the SDP to help you create a plan for serving migratory children that aligns with the overall state accountability system for all children. By following the logic model in Section C: Planning and Documenting the Service Delivery Plan, you will ensure alignment between the goals and the specific MEP outcomes. Therefore, we recommend that your SDP examines, for each goal, the following areas:

  • Performance targets (Measurements of Interim Progress)
  • Alignment to the Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)
  • Service delivery strategies
  • Measurable Program Outcomes (MPOs)
  • Evaluation Plan

In addition, this section provides information about creating a project plan to put your selected service strategies into operation. The following information and resources are provided to assist States with incorporating each of the items listed above into the SDP:

D.1 Performance Targets and Measurements of Interim Progress

D.2 Alignment to the Comprehensive Needs Assessment

D.3 Service Delivery Strategies

D.4 Measurable Program Outcomes

D.5 Evaluation Plan

D.6 Project Planning

D.1 Performance Targets and Measurements of Interim Progress

Performance Targets: Overview

State educational agencies (SEAs) are required to submit to the U.S. Department of Education in their Consolidated State plan the long-term goals and measurements of interim progress that they designed to improve the academic achievement of all children in the State.

A State’s long-term goals and measurements of interim progress represent the results that educators and education policymakers at the State and local levels seek to achieve. They represent the progression from the broad goals of the State for reading/ language arts, math, high school graduation, and English language proficiency to the interim benchmarks that the State must meet to be on track to achieve their long-term goals. To help conceptualize these terms consider the following:

Long-Term Goals–The ESEA long-term goals are the broad expression of the desired results that a State is working to meet. All States have established long-term goals and corresponding measurements of interim progress for improved academic achievement.
Measurements of Interim Progress–Measurements of interim progress are the interim results States expect to achieve by a specified date to assess progress towards their long term goal. Each State is required, as part of the Consolidated State Plan, to develop measurements of interim progress for each goal.

34 C.F.R. § 200.83(a) requires that a State’s MEP service delivery plan include the performance targets that the State has adopted for all children in the areas of

  • reading/language arts;
  • mathematics;
  • high school graduation;
  • school dropouts; as well as the State’s performance targets, if any, for school readiness; and
  • any other performance targets that the State has identified for migratory children

A State should only include performance targets that it has adopted for all children. Therefore, for example, if a State has not adopted a goal for all children related to school dropout, then the State does not need to develop a performance target in their SDP related to school dropout.

In order for migratory children to contribute to the achievement of the State’s goals for all children, they will need to make progress toward achievement of the State’s long-term goals and measurements of interim progress. For this reason, SEAs are encouraged to adopt their State’s measurements of interim progress as their MEP performance targets along with any other performance target the State wishes to create to ensure that migratory children are held to the same high standards as all children in the state.

Additionally, 34 C.F.R. § 200.83(a) requires that the SDP include measurable program outcomes (MPOs) which are the results the MEP hopes to achieve at the State and local operating agency level through the provision of specific educational or educationally related services. MPOs help the MEP determine whether and to what degree it has met the unique educational needs of migratory children that the SEA identified through the comprehensive needs assessment and that will ultimately lead to progress on the performance targets. The MPOs at both the State and local operating agency levels help migratory children achieve the State’s measurements of interim progress. They are MEP-specific and should not be the same method of measurement as the State’s performance targets.

Following is an example of a state long-term goal and measurement of interim progress:

  • Long-Term Goal: By 2023, the 4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate will be 95%.
  • Measurement of Interim Progress: In 2018–2019, 85% of all children will earn a high school diploma within two years of their expected time of high school graduation; each year after, there will be a one-percentage point increase in the number of children who earn a high school diploma within two years of their expected high school graduation until the goal of 95% high school diploma attainment is reached.

Table D.1 provides an overview of the step-by-step process for aligning programs to achieve performance goals. Each step and its related component are detailed in its respective subsection below.

Table D.1 Steps and Components for Program Alignment

Steps to Align Programs with State Performance Targets/Measurements of Interim Progress

Step

SDP Component

Action

Step 1

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

Select a goal area and include the state performance target. Consider adopting the State’s measurements of interim progress as the performance target.

Step 2

Needs assessment

List the related Concern Statements, data summary, and Need Statements which identify unique migrant needs.

Step 3

Service delivery strategies

Select strategies that address each Concern and Need Statement.

Step 4

MPOs

Develop MPOs that quantify the expected difference a selected strategy aimed at contributing to the State performance target will make.

Step 5

Evaluation

Develop evaluation questions to measure strategy implementation and performance outcomes.

We suggest that you, with input from your planning team, develop an alignment chart that shows the relationship among state performance goals, needs, and concerns identified in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) related to the goals, service delivery strategies, MPOs, and evaluation questions. You may find it helpful to complete the Program Alignment Chart Template for each performance goal area.

Step 1. Select a goal area and include the state performance target/Measurement of Interim Progress (Step 1 Alignment Example).

Step 1 Alignment Example: State Long-Term Goal and State Performance Target/Measurement of Interim Progress

Goal Area: Reading and Language Arts

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

The number of all children who attain proficiency in ELA will increase by 2.8 percentage points every year for 10 years, resulting in a 90% proficiency rate.

Considerations for States with Summer-Only Programs.

Some states have migratory children only for limited periods of time in the summer and will need to adapt measurements of interim progress for these children to accommodate the brief time they are in the state. Recommendations specifically related to identifying strategies can be found in Identifying Strategies: Overview, later in this section.

Program Alignment Chart (Template)

(Complete the chart for each goal area. Add rows to include each MPO and strategy.)

Step 5 Alignment Example

Evaluation Questions

Goal Area:

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

Concern Statement

Data summary

Need Statement

Strategy 1

Measurable Program Outcome

Evaluation questions for program results

Evaluation questions for program implementation

Strategy 2

Measurable Program Outcome

Evaluation questions for program results

Evaluation questions for program implementation

D.2 Alignment to the Comprehensive Needs Assessment

Needs Assessment: Overview

As a first step the SDP planning committee should examine the solution strategies outlined in the CNA. By following the CNA process, your CNA team would have identified Concern Statements for migratory children related to areas of concern (e.g., educational continuity, instructional time, school engagement, parental support, access to health services), developed Need Statements and proposed evidence-based solution strategies to address the gaps related to the overall academic performance of migratory children. See Summary of the CNA Process for a snapshot of the framework that the Office of Migrant Education (OME) recommends for the CNA.

The summary of your CNA should highlight the gaps in performance between children who have been identified under the Priority for Services (PFS) provision and other children in order to reinforce the importance of targeting services for these children.

Note that Concern Statements propose possible reasons for the gaps in performance of migratory children based on their unique needs. Need Statements define gaps between overall child performance and the performance of migratory children and especially migratory children identified to receive PFS. The SDP will likely include several Concern Statements and Needs Statements surrounding each state long-term goal.

Step 2. For each state performance goal and performance target/measurement of interim progress, list the related Concern Statements, data summary, and Need Statements as identified in the CNA (Step 2 Alignment Example).

Step 2 Alignment Example: Needs and Concerns Related to State Performance Target/Measurement of Interim Progress

Goal Area: Reading and Language Arts

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

The number of all children who attain proficiency in ELA will increase by 2.8 percentage points every year for 10 years, resulting in a 90% proficiency rate.

Concern Statement

We are concerned that migratory children do not receive sufficient instructional time to achieve proficiency in ELA because of their high mobility and school absences.

Data summary

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA was 47.3% (for migratory children identified to receive PFS, the percentage was 19.2%) compared with the percentage for all children of 61.9%.

Need Statement

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA needs to increase by 14.6% for all migratory children (42.7% for migratory children identified to receive PFS).

Considerations for Small States

For MEP Directors of small states or those states with limited time and resources, we suggest that you discuss with the planning team the scope and scale of the SDP. Specifically, prioritize the needs that you can effectively address in the SDP.

Note the criteria from the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit, Step 3: Gather and Analyze Data that were recommended for focusing the needs of the MEP:

  • Magnitude of the gaps between “what is” and “what should be”
  • Critical nature of the need
  • Unique needs of migratory children identified to receive PFS, migratory preschool children, and migratory children who have dropped out of school
  • Degree of difficulty in addressing the need
  • Risks/consequences of ignoring the need
  • External factors such as state and district priorities and goals

You may also consider addressing needs over time. Perhaps you want to address only a limited set of needs during the first year of the SDP and build on them by addressing other needs in subsequent years.

Summary of the CNA Process (Reference)

The approach outlined in this Toolkit is the result of nearly two decades of research and practice. At the core of this recommended approach is a general five-step model outlined in Needs Assessments: An Overview. [4] OME’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit describes this approach and recommends it for use by state MEPs. The process is only recommended, however; you, as State Director, may choose how to use and adapt the process to fit your program.

The five basic steps for conducting a CNA are as follows:

  • Step 1. Conduct preliminary work
    The State MEP Director
    • reviews requirements of the CNA;
    • develops a Management Plan that sets the project’s general timeline and identifies the teams needed to accomplish each phase;
    • establishes a Needs Assessment Committee (NAC) that reflects a broad representation of perspectives to provide thoughtful guidance to the process; and
    • develops a profile that provides baseline data on the state’s migratory child population.
  • Step 2. Explore what is
    The NAC
    • reviews existing data and program evaluation reports;
    • identifies concerns about migratory children and families; and
    • develops Need Indicators and suggests areas for data collection that will confirm or challenge the NAC’s underlying assumptions about the identified concerns.
  • Step 3. Gather and analyze data
    • The State Director oversees data collection that measures the identified needs and gaps between migratory children and their non-migratory peers.
    • The NAC or a work group organizes and analyzes the data.
    • The NAC or a work group creates a set of Need Statements and prioritizes them.
  • Step 4. Make decisions
    The NAC
    • reviews the prioritized Need Statements and proposes evidence-based solutions for closing the educational gaps that migratory children face in school; and
    • prioritizes the solutions.
  • Step 5. Transition to SDP development
    The State MEP Director
    • writes or oversees the writing of the final CNA report that documents the CNA process and findings;
    • shares the CNA with stakeholders and administrators at the SEA and LEA levels; and
    • uses the CNA as the basis for initiating the SDP planning process.

4 Altschuld, J. W., & Kumar, D. D. (2010). Needs assessment: An overview. Los Angeles: Sage.

Identifying Strategies: Overview

The CNA provided solution strategies for you to consider in developing the SDP. The solution strategies provide a strong starting point for you and the planning team to select the strategies to include in the SDP. Review these strategies and determine which you should implement or adapt for your SDP.

Consider a range of strategies, such as the following:

  • Instructional services for migratory children (to increase their academic achievement)
  • Support services for migratory children (to increase their access to educational opportunities and their ability to come to school ready to learn)
  • Program and staff capacity-building strategies, such as professional development
  • Strategies specific to state-level initiatives
  • Strategies specific to local project-level initiatives

Step 3. Select one or more strategies that address each concern and need in the SDP (Step 3 Alignment Example).

Step 3 Alignment Example: Strategies

Goal Area: Reading and Language Arts

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

The number of all children who attain proficiency in ELA will increase by 2.8 percentage points every year for 10 years, resulting in a 90% proficiency rate.

Concern Statement

We are concerned that migratory children do not receive sufficient instructional time to achieve proficiency in ELA because of their high mobility and school absences.

Data summary

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA was 47.3% (for migratory children identified to receive PFS, the percentage was 19.2%) compared with the percentage for all children of 61.9%.

Need Statement

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA needs to increase by 14.6% for all migratory children (42.7% for migratory children identified to receive PFS).

Strategy 1

1.1. Each year beginning in 2018, local projects will provide 90% of migratory children identified to receive PFS at least 60 hours of reading instruction beyond the school day through supplemental activities, such as after-school programs

Strategy 2

2.1. Local projects will deliver targeted supplemental reading instruction for migratory children identified to receive PFS, based on their reading needs that were identified by a standards-based assessment.

We recommend that you, as the State Director, review the proposed solutions and strategies from the CNA and determine which can be reasonably implemented, especially where resources are limited.

Consider the following elements:

  • Extent to which the solution addresses a critical need (large gap between “what is” and “what should be”; a need that affects many migratory children; or a need that affects subgroups of migratory children most in need, such as migratory children identified to receive PFS)
  • Likelihood that the proposed solution will reduce the gap between “what is” and “what should be”
  • Likelihood that the proposed solution will be appropriate for migratory children in your state
  • Feasibility of implementing the solution (cost, training, resources)
  • Whether the proposed solution will address a need that will only increase in severity if not addressed early
  • Whether the solution addresses a root cause of poor academic performance of migratory children
  • Whether the solution can supplement existing programs
  • Whether the solution can be enhanced through cross-program or cross-agency collaboration
  • Whether the solution can be supported with available resources

Note that the CNA planning team, if it followed the framework recommended in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Toolkit, considered these same criteria when discussing a set of solutions to propose for the SDP.

Considerations for States with Summer-Only Programs

MEPs operating in states in which migratory families reside only in the summer have unique challenges in planning educational services that will help migratory children progress academically. Because these children do not take the state assessment, they are not part of the overall state accountability system.

For states with summer-only programs, time is of the essence. During the short time migratory children are in the state, they must be identified and assessed, and services must be implemented to meet identified needs. Consider the following suggestions for navigating these challenges:

  • Develop interstate agreements for sending and receiving student records, and become proficient in using the Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX).
  • Determine whether a child has previously participated in a summer program in your state. If so, the local education agency (LEA) will likely already have the child’s records.
  • Because children in your state only for the summer will not likely have taken the state assessment, consider using a pre- and post-test approach to measuring growth over the duration of the summer program. You can use a commercially available instrument or one designed specifically for the program. Keep in mind that you must customize indicators of growth to fit the short duration of program.
  • Create MPOs scaled to fit the duration of the program.

The SDP for a summer-only program includes the same components as SDPs in other states but will provide services of shorter duration, making best use of resources available in the summer.

Measurable Program Outcomes: Overview

The ESEA requires the SDP to include MPOs, which are the desired outcomes of the strategies you have identified to help migratory children meet performance targets. An appropriate MPO is one that articulates how participation in the MEP will benefit migratory children. These MPOs, which quantify the impact that you expect the selected strategies will make, are connected to state performance targets/measurements of interim progress. However, they should not use the same measurement as the performance targets. The MPOs you select will inform the evaluation of the MEP. (See the Program Evaluation Toolkit).

Note that a strong MPO is

  • focused;
  • detailed;
  • quantifiable; and
  • has a clear definition of what you would consider a “success” in meeting a particular need.

Key components of an MPO define

  • which children will participate;
  • what will happen in the program;
  • what is expected to happen because of participation in the MEP; and
  • in what time frame it will occur.

As an exercise, review the following MPO that a planning team first proposed for their SDP:

Each year, the percentage of migratory students who graduate on time will increase.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is there a specific time frame?
  • Do you know which migratory children are involved?
  • Do you know which MEP services will be provided?
  • Is the change quantified?

As you can see, the MPO that the planning team developed needs much more specificity, which will guide the team in determining which specific changes (successes) the program should have, which children will be involved, and which services will be provided in a designated time frame.

Note the difference in specificity in a revision of the planning team’s MPO:

After implementing individual credit recovery plans and counseling services [services provided] in the 2018-2019 school year [established time frame] for all secondary migratory students with a deficit of three of more credits [specific, quantifiable, for whom], 80% of these students will have reduced their deficit of high school credits by 50% [quantifiable result] .”

Strong MPOs provide a clear picture of what the MEP aims to achieve in the SDP. MPOs provide the foundation for an SDP that can be clearly communicated, implemented with fidelity, and evaluated.

Step 4. Develop MPOs that will quantify the expected difference a selected strategy will make (Step 4 Alignment Example).

Step 4 Alignment Example: State Performance Target/Measurement of Interim Progress

Goal Area: Reading and Language Arts

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

The number of all children who attain proficiency in ELA will increase by 2.8 percentage points every year for 10 years, resulting in a 90% proficiency rate.

Concern Statement

We are concerned that migratory children do not receive sufficient instructional time to achieve proficiency in ELA because of their high mobility and school absences.

Data summary

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA was 47.3% (for migratory children identified to receive PFS, the percentage was 19.2%) compared with the percentage for all children of 61.9%.

Need Statement

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA needs to increase by 14.6% for all migratory children (42.7% for migratory children identified to receive PFS).

Strategy 1

1.1. Each year beginning in 2018, local projects will provide 90% of migratory children identified to receive PFS at least 60 hours of reading instruction beyond the school day through supplemental activities, such as after-school programs.

Measurable Program Outcome

1.1. Ninety percent of migratory children identified to receive PFS will participate in at least 60 hours of supplemental reading instruction.

Strategy 2

2.1. Local projects will deliver targeted supplemental reading instruction for migratory children identified to receive PFS, based on their reading needs that were identified by a standards-based assessment.

Measurable Program Outcome

2.1. After receiving targeted supplemental reading instruction, 70% of migratory children identified to receive PFS will achieve mastery in the standards/strands in which they received reading instruction, as measured by a curriculum-based measurement (CBM).

Note that including MPOs specifically for PFS children is a strategy to target services for migratory children most in need of educational support and ensure accountability for serving them.

An MPO can relate specifically to instruction and achievement or relate to supporting migratory children as they access and can participate fully in educational opportunities. MPOs for non-instructional support services can address areas such as attendance and student health or access to instruction.

MEP Evaluation: Overview

Developing evaluation questions in the SDP provides a foundation for the MEP evaluation. The MEP evaluation is addressed in the Program Evaluation Toolkit.

State performance targets/measurements of interim progress and MPOs establish a concrete vision for high-quality educational programs. They also serve as benchmarks against which to monitor and evaluate program success. MEP evaluation takes place at two levels:

  • At the state level, you will monitor the results of all MEP activities and services combined by disaggregating State performance targets/measurements of interim progress for migratory children, identified subpopulations of migratory children, and all non-migratory children.
  • At the service delivery level, the implementation and results of specific educational or educationally related services must be evaluated by the state or local MEPs that deliver them to migratory children and their families. Details about how you will evaluate the services you deliver are provided in the SDP:
    • Evaluating results involves collecting data related to the MPOs in the SDP and comparing actual outcomes to the expected outcomes defined in the MPOs. Ideally, MPOs for instructional services should reflect expected improvements in academic performance, while MPOs for other support services should reflect expectations for increased participation and engagement in schooling.
    • Evaluating implementation involves monitoring the quality of service delivery and the extent to which planned activities were carried out according to the SDP. This process may provide insight into the program elements most associated with success or shed light on how limitations in service delivery may have affected results.

As recommended in Section C, Planning and Documenting the Service Delivery Plan, the MEP evaluator may be a member of the planning team. This person will collaborate with other team members to

  • craft MPOs that contribute to the accomplishment of State performance targets/measurements of interim progress
  • focus the evaluation by generating a manageable set of questions related to implementation and results;
  • identify potential sources of data or evidence related to the quality of implementation and achievement of MPOs; and
  • select the most appropriate methods for collecting and analyzing this evidence.

The MEP evaluator will also be able to assist in aggregating outcomes achieved by local projects for state-level reporting and in summarizing the findings of the implementation evaluations across local projects.

Developing a manageable set of evaluation questions is critical for focusing the Evaluation Plan and making the best use of the resources available to conduct an evaluation at the service delivery level.

Building on the example discussed earlier in developing the alignment chart, note how the evaluation questions directly relate to the MPOs. A well-written MPO facilitates the development of evaluation questions that directly address program results and implementation. Alignment Example D.5 illustrates the linkage of all components of the SDP, reinforcing the alignment of all parts of the plan.

Step 5. Develop evaluation questions for results (that relate to the MPOs) and for implementation (that relate to the strategies).

Step 5 Alignment Example: Evaluation Questions

Goal Area: Reading and Language Arts

State performance target/Measurement of interim progress

The number of all children who attain proficiency in ELA will increase by 2.8 percentage points every year for 10 years, resulting in a 90% proficiency rate.

Concern Statement

We are concerned that migratory children do not receive sufficient instructional time to achieve proficiency in ELA because of their high mobility and school absences.

Data summary

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA was 47.3% (for migratory children identified to receive PFS, the percentage was 19.2%) compared with the percentage for all children of 61.9%.

Need Statement

In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migratory children performing at the proficient or advanced levels in ELA needs to increase by 14.6% for all migratory children (42.7% for migratory children identified to receive PFS).

Strategy 1

1.1. Each year beginning in 2018, local projects will provide 90% of migratory children identified to receive PFS at least 60 hours of reading instruction beyond the school day through supplemental activities, such as after-school programs.

Measurable Program Outcome

1.1. Ninety percent of migratory children identified to receive PFS will participate in at least 60 hours of supplemental reading instruction.

Evaluation question for program result

  • What percentage of migratory children identified to receive PFS participated in at least 60 hours of supplemental reading instruction this year?

Evaluation questions for program implementation

  • What percentages of local projects were able to provide supplemental reading instruction beyond the school day for 90% of migratory children identified to receive PFS?
  • What is the mean (or median) percentage of migratory children identified to receive PFS who received supplemental reading instruction beyond the school day through local projects?
  • How did local projects that had a 90% participation rate in supplemental reading instruction beyond the school day among migratory children identified to receive PFS remove barriers or facilitate participation?

Strategy 2

2.1. Local projects will deliver targeted supplemental reading instruction for migratory children identified to receive PFS, based on their reading needs that were identified by a standards-based assessment.

Measurable Program Outcome

2.1. After receiving targeted supplemental reading instruction, 70% of migratory children identified to receive PFS will achieve mastery in the standards/strands in which they received reading instruction, as measured by a curriculum-based measurement (CBM).

Evaluation questions for program results

  • What percentage of migratory children identified to receive PFS who received 60 or more hours of supplemental reading instruction demonstrated mastery in the standards/strands in which they received reading instruction, as measured by a CBM?

Evaluation questions for program implementation

  • What percentage of local projects administered targeted supplemental reading instruction to migratory children?
  • To what extent were local projects able to target instruction to meet the needs of individual children?
  • Was targeted instruction provided in groups or one on one?
  • How did projects, where children made the greatest gains in ELA, meet the needs of individual children?

When you have identified the evaluation questions, complete the Evaluation Plan by identifying what data will be needed to answer the evaluation questions, where to find them, how to collect them, who will be responsible for collecting them, and when they should be collected.

These topics are covered in the Program Evaluation Toolkit, which is intended as a stand-alone guide for evaluating MEPs. It can also be used as a reference for information about

  • understanding state and local requirements for evaluating the MEP;
  • planning the evaluation;
  • collecting evaluation data;
  • analyzing and interpreting evaluation data;
  • reporting evaluation findings; and
  • using evaluation results.

Keep in mind that the evaluation is part of the Continuous Improvement Planning Process described in Section A, Introduction and Overview, and the SDP should include specific activities throughout the implementation of the plan for reviewing formative and summative evaluation data and making mid-course changes. (See Section G.2. Revising and Updating the SDP)

D.6 Project Planning

Developing a Project Plan: Overview

Now that you have created an aligned SDP, the next step is to develop a project plan to flesh out activities, establish a timeline, and identify who will conduct the activities and the resources needed. Note that the activities are connected to each strategy. You will need to determine which activities will be conducted at the state level and which at the local project level. The State is required to ensure that its local projects comply with the comprehensive State plan. Therefore, you will also need to consider how much flexibility local projects have, beyond the SDP, to determine their own activities to implement the strategies in the SDP and to achieve the MPOs.

Once you have selected the strategies for the SDP and feel confident that they will meet identified needs and result in the outcomes and targets you have set, we recommend that you address the logistics of how the work will be accomplished. Each strategy should be broken down into smaller tasks and activities that have deadlines, people or agencies responsible, and resources identified.

Consider the following key questions:

  • Which strategies will be conducted at the state level, and which will be conducted at the local level?
  • For those conducted at the local level, what activities must take place at the state level to communicate local-level expectations and provide support (professional development and technical assistance), oversight, and accountability to ensure that the strategies are implemented?
  • What other programs and agencies will be involved in the implementation of the SDP, and which tasks must take place to communicate expectations and ensure follow-through?
  • What is the timeline for each activity to be completed?
  • What resources are needed for each activity—staffing, funding, or materials?

In Table D.2, which presents a sample project plan that is the result of completing steps 1 through 5, note how the strategies are put into operation through activities. Once specific activities have been identified, setting timelines, assigning responsibility, and identifying resources will enable you and all others involved with SDP implementation to know what is expected and to establish accountability.

Table D.2 SDP Project Plan

Goal Area: ELA

MPO.1.1: Ninety percent of migratory children identified to receive PFS will participate in at least 60 hours of supplemental reading instruction.

Strategy(ies)

Activities/Tasks

Projected Completion Date

Agency/Level (SEA or LOA) Responsible

Resources Needed

Strategy 1.1: Each year beginning in 2018, local projects will provide 90% of migratory children identified to receive PFS at least 60 hours of reading instruction beyond the school day through supplemental activities, such as after-school programs

1.1.1. Through professional development activities for LOA staff, the MEP will provide information about effective models of after-school programs that serve migratory children.

9/1/18

MEP

MEP staff time; consultation with ELA and curriculum specialists; venues for professional development—Webinars or conferences

1.1.2. Local programs will establish after-school programs for migratory children identified to receive PFS where the need for these programs exists.

9/1/19

Local operating agencies (LOAs)

Local staff time; facility; community support; materials; instructional staffing; operational funding

1.1.3. Local programs will contact each parent of a migratory child identified to receive PFS and assist with enrolling the child in after-school programs.

9/1/20

LOAs

Local staff time; database with all migratory children identified to receive PFS

1.1.4. Local programs will identify and remove barriers to participation in after-school programs, such as lack of transportation and poor health, for migratory children identified to receive PFS.

Ongoing once the program has been implemented

LOAs

Local staff time; school district and community resources

1.3.1. Local programs will identify existing after-school instructional programs and establish ways to prioritize enrollment and services for migratory children identified to receive PFS; memoranda of understanding and formal partnerships will be established as appropriate.

9/1/18

MEP

Local staff time; time with school district and community programs; resources to ensure unique needs of migratory children are met in these programs

MPO.2.1: After receiving targeted supplemental reading instruction, 70% of migratory children identified to receive PFS will achieve mastery in the standards/strands in which they received reading instruction, as measured by a curriculum-based measurement (CBM).

Strategy 2.1 Local projects will deliver targeted supplemental reading instruction for migratory children identified to receive PFS, based on their reading needs that were identified by a standards-based assessment.

2.1.1. MEP will provide a list of recommended targeted reading instruction models based on State standards or strands.

9/1/18

LOAs

MEP staff time; consultation with ELA assessment specialists; venue for communication and professional development

2.1.2. Local projects will select and administer appropriate targeted reading instruction to migratory children identified to receive PFS.

11/1/18

LOAs

Local staff time;; classroom materials; venue for instruction

2.1.3. After administering the program, local MEP staff will measure the migratory children’s mastery of the selected standards/ strands through a CBM.

1/1/19

LOAs

Local staff time for the development, administration and analysis of the CBM.

The information in Table D.2 and the Project Planning Chart will help you think through project activities and provide you with a plan to share with all those involved in carrying out tasks. We suggest that you complete the chart for each MPO.

As you develop the project plan, identify programs and agencies that serve migratory children with which the MEP can collaborate. For example, Title I, Part A and Title III of ESEA serve migratory children, and you could include some strategies in programs and services already in place for at-risk students. Consider external agencies, as well, such as Boys and Girls Clubs that offer after-school programs. Leveraging resources and establishing partnerships with programs and agencies will ensure that services are not duplicated and funds are spent efficiently.

Recommendations for SDP Planning Team Meeting: Developing Aligned Components (Reference)

SDP Planning Team Meeting: Developing Aligned Components

Purpose

Outcomes

Development of aligned components that are included in the SDP:

  1. State performance targets/Measurements of interim progress
  2. Needs assessment information
  3. Service delivery strategies
  4. MPOs
  5. Evaluation Plan
  6. Development of project plan
  • Completed alignment chart
  • Completed project plan

Suggestions:

  • Discuss the importance of alignment of all parts of the SDP by reviewing the logic model and “if-then” logic.
  • Review the required components of the SDP and the Program Alignment Chart; in a series of whole-group discussions and small-group activities, have the planning team complete the alignment chart:
    • Identify the Concern Statements in the CNA that relate to state performance goals and targets, identify data in the CNA that affirm these concerns, and select the solution strategies that you would like to include in the SDP (discuss the criteria for selection of the concerns and strategies).
    • Lead the planning team through the exercise for developing MPOs in Measurable Program Outcomes: Overview to build a common understanding of how to create strong MPOs.
    • Develop evaluation questions for each MPO.
  • Discuss implementation challenges, resources, and collaborators in preparation for the planning team to complete the project plan; this could be an activity in which small groups take related strategies and complete the Project Planning Chart, and then the whole group reviews to ensure coherence.

Follow-Up:

Project Planning Chart (Template)

Goal Area

MPO:

Strategy(ies)

Activities/Tasks

Projected Completion Date

Agency/Level (SEA or LOA) Responsible

Resources Needed

Section E: Addressing the Needs of Migratory Children

Section E Overview: Addressing the Needs of Migratory Children

Migratory children who have been identified under the Priority for Services (PFS) provision are a subgroup of special concern. Not only does this subgroup need more intensive services to address their risk factors, but, per ESEA Section 1304(c), States must provide services to this subpopulation first. A State can meet its PFS obligations by taking into account the unique needs of children identified as PFS throughout the CNA and SDP processes.

In addition, per ESEA Section 1304(b)(1), the SDP should specifically address the unique needs of preschool migratory children and migratory children who have dropped out of school.

The results of your Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) will provide you with a good starting point for identifying the needs of the most at-risk subgroups of migratory children. Make sure that you have identified the needs of these groups specifically before proceeding with the SDP. The information and resources included in this section will help you to further identify and select strategies to specifically meet the unique needs of these special populations.

Proper identification and recruitment of migratory children is critical for SEAs to ensure they receive the full range of services available to them. The SEA should maintain a written description, ideally within the SDP, of how it shall conduct the identification and recruitment (ID&R) of all eligible migratory children and document the basis of a child’s eligibility. A description of the SEA’s ID&R model and key activities helps LOAs understand the full operation of the MEP in the state. Additional information on ID&R requirements and strategies is available in the National Identification and Recruitment Manual.

Interstate and intrastate coordination is essential to by provide for educational continuity through the timely transfer of pertinent school records (including health information) for migratory children. Additional information regarding the transfer of records is provided in this section.

E.1 Focusing on Special Populations of Migratory Children

E.2 Exchange of Records of Migratory Children and Youth

E.1 Focusing on Special Populations of Migratory Children

Migratory Children Identified to Receive Priority for Services

In accordance with what is referred to as the Priority for Services (PFS) provision of ESEA Section 1304(d), the State must first provide services to migratory children identified to receive PFS: those children who have made a qualifying move within the previous one-year period AND who

  • are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet the challenging state academic standards; or
  • have dropped out of school.

Migratory children identified to receive PFS are less likely than their peers to achieve academic success. Therefore, the state education agency (SEA) must prioritize delivery of services to these children above all others. While the needs of these children may be included throughout the SDP, having a specific section focused on migratory children identified to receive PFS provides an opportunity to clearly define how your MEP identifies, implements, and evaluates services for these children.

Establishing State Criteria for Identifying Migratory Children Who Should Have Priority for Services

Establishing state criteria for identifying PFS migratory children will result in all local programs using the same criteria to distinguish these children and address their unique needs accordingly. These criteria should be listed in the SDP for easy reference.

Recommendations for Ensuring Service Delivery to Migratory Children Identified to Receive Priority for Services

By thoroughly establishing guidelines and accountability for how your SEA implements requirements for serving migratory children identified to receive PFS, you can alleviate any confusion by local operating agencies (LOAs) as they implement services for migratory children. Having well-defined PFS guidelines in your SDP helps to document program efforts and ensures compliance with the law.

As you develop the state’s guidelines for PFS, consider enlisting school and school district staff to help in identifying children at risk, such as the district data officer, school principals, and guidance counselors. Following are strategies MEPs have used to help LOAs identify, serve, and be held accountable for serving migratory children identified to receive PFS:

  • Create a filter in the state student data system or migratory student database that “flags” the records of children as they meet the criteria for PFS eligibility; provide information about these children to local projects. This strategy will also enable the MEP to follow up to see if these children are targeted for services in LOAs.
  • Provide written guidance on identifying and serving migratory children identified to receive PFS.

Methods to ensure these children receive services at the local level may include the following:

  • Include an indicator in the LOA monitoring protocol on specific ways the MEP identifies and serves these children. Some states review state assessment scores that are disaggregated by migratory children identified to receive PFS to ensure that these children are meeting MEP performance targets.
  • Develop a tool, such as a form, to help local sites identify these children.

See Strategies for Addressing the Needs of Special Populations for suggested strategies to meet the particular educational challenges of migratory children identified to receive PFS.

Preschool Migratory Children and Migratory Children Who Have Dropped Out of School

Preschool Migratory Children

Section 1304(c)(4) of ESEA requires that States, in carrying out their programs and projects, address the unmet needs of preschool migratory children. Young children of migratory and seasonal farmworkers often face a number of challenges that place them at risk for developmental delay and affect their later school achievement and success.

Preschool migratory children can overcome educational challenges by participating in preschool programs and services. Unfortunately, these children are often underrepresented in early childhood programs because of factors related to access, availability, and affordability. As a result, it is important that you and local project coordinators have a clear understanding of what type of programs are needed to serve the unique needs of preschool migratory children as well as how to reach out to their families to make early education programs accessible to them.

See Strategies for Addressing the Needs of Special Populations for strategies to consider for addressing the educational challenges that preschool migratory children face.

Migratory Children Who Have Dropped Out of School

Each SEA receiving Title I, Part C funding must include a description of how in planning, implementing, and evaluating it and its LOAs will ensure that the unique needs of migratory children, including migratory children who have dropped out of school are identified and addressed.

We recommend including a section in the SDP that addresses the unique needs of this group or ensuring that when selecting service delivery strategies these children are highlighted. The SDP can be used to direct LOAs on how to connect migratory children who have dropped out of school to services or ensure that they are aware of services for which they are eligible. The challenges faced by migratory children who have dropped out of school may overlap with the challenges faced by migratory children identified to receive PFS. The educational challenges of migratory children who have dropped out of school (e.g., significant credit deficits), however, merit specific attention in the SDP. Many of these children lack basic needs such as housing, food, clothing, and transportation. If the child is here to work, his/her day-to-day existence may hinge on efforts to meet those basic needs.

Other areas the MEP may identify include but are not limited to healthcare needs, language barriers, isolation, poor support to participate in educational opportunities, and little or no information about vocational or career opportunities.

Issues to Address for Migratory Children Identified to Receive Priority for Services in the SDP (Reference)

The section of the SDP that addresses migratory children identified to receive priority for services should address the following questions:

  • What are the criteria by which to identify these children?
  • What guidance will the MEP provide to local projects to clarify the policies and procedures for identifying and targeting services for these children? You may want to suggest
    • disaggregating data on these migratory children;
    • implementing policies and procedures to assess the needs of these children when they enroll in school and quickly linking them to instructional and non-instructional services;
    • providing additional monitoring of the progress of these children through frequent assessment, ongoing identification of needs, and modifications of services as needed;
    • documenting services provided to these children; and
    • working with parents of these children to help them support their children’s academic needs, minimize disruption resulting from their mobility, and facilitate regular attendance.
  • Which MPOs and evaluation questions in the SDP will relate specifically to these children?
  • Which indicators relating specifically to these migratory children will be included in the local monitoring protocol?

Strategies for Addressing the Needs of Special Populations (Reference)

Challenges of Serving Migratory Children Identified to Receive Priority for Services and Strategies to Consider

Challenges and Services Needed

Strategies to Consider

Minimizing disruption caused by frequent mobility

  • Assess migratory children identified to receive priority for services when they enroll in school if there is a delay in obtaining their academic records; implement policies and procedures to ensure that these children are quickly linked to instructional and non-instructional services.
  • Have student records exchange policies in place to facilitate the easy transfer of school records.
  • Provide support to help orient migratory children to a new school and make friends.
  • Closely monitor the attendance of these children and follow up when attendance becomes irregular or ceases.

Providing opportunities for migratory children identified to receive priority for services to improve academically

  • Provide supplemental services at a rate greater than that experienced by other migratory children less at risk of academic failure, including after-school and summer programming.
  • Assess these children’s progress frequently because many will be in the school system only a short time and will not be present for the state assessment.

Facilitating parental involvement

  • Help parents understand the impact of mobility on their children’s education and consider moving at times when the least disruption occurs, such as at the end of the school year or semester, during breaks, or after grading periods.
  • Reinforce the importance of enrolling their children quickly when they move to a new site.
  • Help parents keep their children’s records (birth certificates, immunization records, report cards) in a convenient place (such as a folder) so that they can provide them on enrolling their children in a new school.

Ways to ensure that the needs of migratory children identified to receive priority for services are addressed throughout the SDP include

  • disaggregating performance data for these children;
  • including strategies, MPOs, and program evaluation questions specifically for these children;
  • requiring that requests for applications for local project funding specifically address how these children will be identified and provided services and how their success will be measured; and
  • including indicators in the local monitoring protocol that address how a local project specifically directs services toward these children.

Challenges for Serving Preschool Children and Strategies to Consider

Challenges and Services Needed

Strategies to Consider

Greater access to high-quality early childhood education programs

  • Compile a list of local preschool programs that may enroll migratory children and distribute that list to parents. Be sure that the information is in families’ native language.
  • Strengthen the resource and referral system within your community to ensure that families receive appropriate early childhood services to meet their needs and support the migratory preschool child’s development.
  • Promote awareness of the unique factors that affect the lives of migratory children by offering professional development and training to service providers.
  • Work with programs to offer full-day services of 12–15 hours’ duration during peak harvest season.
  • Organize four- to six-week summer academies for children entering kindergarten in the fall to boost school readiness.
  • Establish agreements or memoranda of understanding with Head Start and other preschool programs to hold slots for a certain number of migratory children who may not be in state in September when such programs often reach full enrollment.

Healthcare

  • Work with community agencies and service providers to offer an array of healthcare services, including health, dental, mental health, nutrition, and disabilities services.
  • Offer a day of screening and immunizations and distribute information within the migratory community.
  • Ensure that children are signed up for available child health insurance programs.

Parental involvement

  • Educate parents about the importance of high-quality early childhood education, and help them advocate on behalf of their children.
  • Engage parents in children’s learning by providing classes on child development or early literacy. Arrange transportation to and from classes; offer child care, if needed.
  • Provide parents with developmentally appropriate educational materials that they can use at home with their preschool-aged children.

Challenges for Serving Migratory Children Who Have Dropped Out of School and Strategies to Consider

Challenges and Services Needed

Strategies to Consider

Healthcare needs

  • Provide opportunities for health education on topics such as basic nutrition, proper dental care, and drug and alcohol awareness.
  • Distribute healthcare information and dental kits.
  • Ensure that youth are signed up for available child health insurance programs or other health programs for which they may be eligible.

Language barrier

  • Provide access to English language development and literacy classes in a variety of settings (e.g., in camp, in home, community sites) and on a flexible schedule (days, nights, and weekends).
  • Collaborate with local employers to recruit participants and arrange class schedules.

Isolation and poor support to participate in educational opportunities

  • Help students locate and gain access to the appropriate educational placement (e.g., return to school, credit recovery, high-school equivalency exam preparation).
  • Arrange transportation to and from classes; offer child care, if needed.
  • Provide mobile education services that travel throughout the community, or look for opportunities to offer distance learning courses/training.

Lack of information about vocational or career opportunities

  • Collaborate with local community colleges or career technical/vocational certificate programs to offer aptitude screening or vocational counseling.
  • Offer mini-workshops on budgeting and managing money. Connect youth with local career coaches or mentors.
  • Conduct classes focused on improving life skills such as searching for a job and interviewing, going to the store, and paying bills.

Recommendations for SDP Planning Team Meeting: Addressing Migratory Children’s Needs (Reference)

SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN

SDP Planning Team Meeting: Addressing Migratory Children’s Needs
State Department of Education

Purpose

Outcomes

Develop strategies and plans for suggested sections on

  • addressing the needs of migratory children identified to receive priority for services;
  • ID&R;
  • parental involvement; and
  • exchange of student records.

Plans for suggested sections on

  • addressing the needs of migratory children identified to receive priority for services;
  • ID&R;
  • parental involvement; and
  • exchange of student records.

Suggestions:

  • Establish work groups for each SDP section to be developed: migratory children identified to receive priority for services, ID&R, parental involvement (see Section F), and exchange of student records. Include both planning team members and individuals who have expertise external to the planning process.
  • Orient the group to the purpose of the meeting, and then convene each work group separately in breakout sessions.
  • Provide a template to frame the conversation and specify outcomes for each work group. (The template can serve as the basis for a whole-group report.)
  • Reconvene the whole group at the end of the day for a report from each work group and further input from the whole group.

Follow-Up:

  • Use notes from the work groups as the basis for developing the sections of the SDP on each of these topics.

Requirements for Exchange of Student Records: Overview

Migratory children experience frequent moves, often with short notice to schools. As a result, enrolling schools often have limited information about student performance and credit accrual. The timely exchange of student records helps reduce the effects of educational disruption on children’s academic achievement.

Title I, Part C of ESEA requires SEAs to promote interstate and intrastate coordination by providing for educational continuity through the timely transfer of pertinent school records (including health) when children move from one school to another, whether or not the move occurs during the regular school year. SEAs must request records of eligible migratory children who arrive in their state and transmit (typically, electronically) records of children moving to other states.

When states, districts, and schools can share information about a specific child, critical decisions can be made concerning enrollment, grade placement, credit accrual, and academic performance. Further, information related to chronic health conditions can be communicated between programs to ensure that children are connected with social services that support their active participation in educational opportunities.

Including a section in the SDP for the timely transfer of student records will ensure that local education agencies (LEAs) and schools understand state policies and procedures to minimize delays in enrolling and serving migratory children and making their records available to other school districts in which these children may enroll.

Migrant Student Information Exchange

The U.S. Department of Education developed the Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX) to ensure the appropriate enrollment, placement, and accrual of credits for migratory children. This technology enables states to share educational and health information about migratory children who travel from state to state and, as a result, have student records in multiple states’ student information systems. A State can meet its obligations to transfer student records by its full participation in MSIX as captured through the CNA and SDP process. The MSIX Website provides resources and documents to explain the MSIX initiative and how it consolidates information from state systems. Users will find online training courses, a Webinar series overviewing use of the system, and a link to frequently asked questions.

It is recommended that you, as State Director, review 34 CFR §§ 200.81, 200.82(c) and 200.85 to ensure the SEA’s MSIX guidelines and policy comply with federal rules.

Section F: The Role of Parents of Migratory Children in the SDP Process

Section F Overview: The Role of Parents of Migratory Children in the SDP Process

Section 1304 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), requires that both the State MEP and local operating agencies (LOAs) consult with parents of migratory children, including Parent Advisory Councils (PACs) in planning and operating programs and projects that last at least one school year. In addition, these programs and projects must be carried out, whenever possible, according to the same parental involvement requirements of Section 1116 of ESEA. This provision requires SEAs and LOAs to involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of the MEP.

Section 1116 requires States to demonstrate, in their Consolidated State Plan, that they will provide schools and districts with effective parental engagement strategies. For their part, LOAs must have a state-approved plan for parental engagement that establishes the LOA’s expectations and objectives for meaningful parent and family involvement. In addition, 34 C.F.R. § 200.83(b) requires SEAs to develop their SDP in consultation with the State Parent Advisory Council (PAC) if the program is one school year in duration. If the program is less than one school year in duration, the SEA must consult with parents of migratory children. The consultation must be in a format and language that the parents understand.

Parental consultation in planning the MEP at the State and local level is critical because, parents, as the first teachers of their children, know their children best and can provide insight into their children’s strengths and weaknesses. As such, parents of migratory children can play a pivotal role in planning the educational programs and projects in which their children participate. Involving parents of migratory children in planning the MEP also builds their capacity to assist their children’s learning at home.

Including parents of migratory children in the SDP process as well as the inclusion of strategies in your SDP of how to consult with PACs about the planning and operation of the MEP at the state and local level will help ensure meaningful engagement parents in their children’s education in addition to enriching the SDP final product. The information that follows is related to meaningful consultation and involvement of migrant parents and of PACs in the overall MEP at the state and local levels as well as in the development of the SDP.

F.1 Parent Advisory Councils

State and Local MEP Parent Advisory Councils: Inclusion in SDP

State MEP Parent Advisory Councils

According to ESEA Section 1304(c)(3), States must consult with the parents of migratory children, including Parent Advisory Councils (PACs), in planning and operating of state and local programs and projects that last at least one school year in duration and should be used to offer consultation on the planning and operation of programs at both the state and local levels. As stated above, MEP regulations require SEAs to develop their SDP in consultation with the State PAC if the program is one school year in duration. If the program is less than one school year in duration, the SEA must consult with migrant parents in a format and language that the parents understand.

One very critical way to consult with parents of migratory children regarding the SDP is to seek their membership in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) and SDP planning teams. The State PAC president or other State PAC members may volunteer or be nominated by State PAC membership to serve on one or both of these planning teams. If time is a factor, State PAC members could have representation on the CNA and SDP planning teams as advisory members. The key is to ensure that State PAC members and parents of migratory children are able to provide meaningful consultation in the development of the SDP.

We suggest including a parent involvement plan in the SDP, outlining the specific policies and procedures that the SEA will implement to address parents of migratory children and State PAC involvement in the MEP:

  • Purpose and responsibilities of the State PAC, including mission statement or by-laws if they exist
  • Types of consultation gathered from the State PAC or parents of migratory children (if the program is less than one school year in duration) regarding the planning and implementation of the MEP on a statewide level
  • Number of representatives and role groups represented—specifically, the number of parents of migratory children on the State PAC
  • Number of meetings held per year, including how locations are selected and how members are supported in their attendance
  • Activities that support the work of the State PAC, such as a MEP-related conference or one for parents.

Local Parent Advisory Councils: Inclusion in SDP

Local PACs operate in an advisory capacity to the local migrant program and the State MEP. They can also link parents of migratory children to support and resources to enable their children to succeed in school.

The MEP at the state level sets the expectation for the local projects to establish PACs. We suggest including the following elements in the SDP to ensure that local PACs are established and guided in effective operations:

  • Information, training, and technical assistance provided to local projects in establishing PACs
  • Ways that local project applications will include information on the establishment, membership, and operation of the PAC
  • Strategies on ways the local project will have meaningful consultation with parents of migratory children and local PACs regarding the operation of the MEP at the district and campus levels.
  • Ways the local PAC will be included in the local monitoring and project evaluation process
  • Strategies for ensuring that local PACs inform the State PAC and MEP program planning

Section G: Sharing, Using, and Updating the Service Delivery Plan

Section G: Overview

To ensure effective implementation of the Service Delivery Plan (SDP) at all levels, it is important to engage state and local stakeholders throughout the planning and execution of the plan. Those charged with delivery of services should understand the connections between the children's needs and the services identified. Ultimately, the Migrant Education Program (MEP) will want to get their input to ensure that the SDP can effectively guide the activities needed to meet the Measurable Program Outcomes (MPOs).

A new SDP, particularly one that requires stakeholders to change their practices, can generate resistance or excitement over an opportunity to improve services. How you handle communication of the SDP can affect stakeholders’ reactions. Therefore, we recommend including a section in the SDP that details how you will communicate the SDP to local projects and stakeholders, how local projects will receive training and support to implement the SDP, and how you will review data and make adjustments so that the SDP remains relevant and constructive.

This section provides information and resources to help you develop plans for sharing, using, and updating the SDP.

G.1 Engaging the Community with the SDP

G.2. Revising and Updating the SDP

G.1 Engaging the Community with the SDP

Sending the SDP for Review

Before you finalize the SDP, you may want to engage stakeholders who were not involved in the SDP development process to review the draft SDP. These “fresh eyes” will help ensure that the SDP is readable, coherent, and likely to be effective. This step can also provide an opportunity to begin communicating the SDP to a wider range of stakeholders. Consider engaging the following groups in a review of the draft SDP:

  • Local migrant education program staff
  • State and local Parent Advisory Councils (PACs), as well as parents of migratory children who are non-PAC members
  • Administrators from other federal programs, such as Title I, Part A or Title III
  • Program planning and evaluation staff

Consider providing a feedback form that requests specific information to help you revise the SDP. Sending an electronic copy of the SDP with a link to an online survey is a particularly efficient way to solicit and gather feedback. We provide a sample SDP Feedback Form that you can adapt as needed and distribute as a document or prepare as an online survey. You may want to tailor the feedback form for various groups of stakeholders—for example, parents may have different concerns and insights about aspects of the SDP than would program staff. Try to estimate the amount of time reviewers will likely have to provide feedback, and tailor the set of questions accordingly, prioritizing by what is most important for you to know to finalize the SDP.

Communicate the Plan to Local Operating Agencies

Once you have conducted a review of the SDP and finalized it based on stakeholder input, share the SDP with local operating agencies (LOAs). 34 C.F.R. § 200.83(c) requires the SEA to ensure its local operating agencies comply with the plan. Most of the services for migratory children occur at the local project level; therefore, LOAs’ understanding of the SDP’s purpose and the expectations for them to implement it are critical. LOAs that understand the SDP will be able to make better day-to-day decisions and carry out the SDP as intended. Regular, ongoing communication and guidance from the State MEP will support their understanding and implementation. Following are some strategies to communicate the SDP to LOAs and support implementation:

  • Post a link to the SDP on the State MEP Web site.
  • Create a listserv that includes local project directors; use the listserv to distribute information about the SDP and identify key dates.
  • Conduct presentations on the SDP at state and local conferences; ensure that local project directors understand the state performance targets and state strategies identified to meet the needs of migratory children. These presentations will provide an opportunity for the local projects to provide feedback and ask questions.
  • Conduct presentations at conferences sponsored by other federal programs, informing them of the unique educational needs of migratory children and ways the migrant-specific SDP will address those needs. Many of the attendees may be collaborating partners for the local projects and can provide additional support and reinforcement for implementing the SDP at the local level.
  • Regularly provide onsite or online training to build the capacity of LOAs to plan their local programs in a process that mirrors planning at the state level—that is, provide training on topics such as conducting a needs assessment, logic model thinking, developing MPOs, and evaluating their program.

For additional technical assistance strategies for LOAs, see Section H, Ensuring Implementation and Accountability in Local Programs.

Resistance to change may be a common problem encountered when launching a new initiative. To avoid resistance to SDP implementation, consider the following strategies:

  • Facilitate open, two-way communication among all stakeholders. Gather information about stakeholders’ concerns, and address these concerns directly, either in a group setting or with certain individuals, as needed.
  • Reinforce that the SDP development included representatives from local projects and was based on an analysis of data that identified the unique educational needs of migratory children in the state.
  • When presenting the SDP or providing professional development on SDP implementation, invite local project directors to discuss successes they have had in implementing the SDP, challenges they have faced and ways to overcome them. The best spokespeople for the SDP are those who can help their peers understand the benefits and address the challenges.
  • Be clear in the expectations for how the local projects are accountable for SDP implementation through the granting process and local monitoring; explain the consequences for not implementing the SDP.
  • Offer customized support to help LOAs develop their local plans and use their resources effectively.
  • Be open to LOAs providing alternatives to strategies in the SDP if they can provide strong data that support their rationale and can provide a plan that will likely achieve the MPOs in the SDP and state performance targets.

We recommend that you include in your SDP a list of activities and a timeline for announcing the SDP to local projects and getting them up to speed in implementing it. First-year activities may include

  • sending a memo to local project directors and school district superintendents announcing the SDP and ways that it will benefit migratory children;
  • presenting an overview of the SDP at state education conferences or conferences focused on migrant services;
  • developing a series of Webinars on parts of the SDP to build local capacity for planning and implementation; and
  • conducting quarterly conference calls so that local projects can ask questions or discuss challenges.

Communicating the Plan to Other Stakeholder Groups and Collaborators

Other stakeholders involved in the development of the SDP but less critical to the day-to-day implementation may not need as much ongoing communication as LOAs, but should still be familiar with the SDP and the plans for its implementation. These stakeholders include Parent Advisory Councils (PACs)[5] and may also include representatives from other federal programs, state-level administrators, and collaborating agencies.

We suggest that you include in your SDP a plan for how you will communicate with stakeholders about the SDP itself. Activities may include

  • sending a copy of the final SDP to various state agencies and groups involved in migrant services and to advisory councils or advocacy groups that may represent the interests of migratory children or their families;
  • posting a copy of the final SDP on the MEP Web site (and send individuals an email announcement with a link or post the link on listservs);
  • preparing presentations for
    • federal program conferences;
    • state and local PAC meetings;
    • state and local parental involvement meetings/conferences
    • state education agency (SEA) administrative staff meetings; and
    • agencies that serve migratory children.

5 34 C.F.R. § 200.83(b) requires the SEA to develop its comprehensive State plan in consultation with the State Parent Advisory Council, or for SEAs not operating programs for one school year in duration, in consultation with the parents of migratory children.

Maintaining Partnerships and Coordination with Other Programs

Maintaining partnerships and collaborating with other federal and state-level programs and agencies that serve migratory children will enable you to coordinate resources effectively and keep stakeholders actively involved. In addition to involving them as planning team members, consider efforts such as cross-program training, sharing data, and co-presenting at meetings and conferences to identify areas of common need that offer opportunities for coordination and resource sharing.

The RESULTS Web site provides information on the various federal programs providing resources and support to migratory children. You will also want to consider state, regional, and local agencies with which you currently collaborate as well as those with which you want to build and strengthen partnerships.

Making a chart, such as Collaborations to Build and Maintain, can help you document connections that you currently have as well as those you want to cultivate. We suggest that you complete this chart to think about additional opportunities for coordination and collaboration. Be sure to identify relationships that are not yet achieving their potential and follow up with those partners.

We suggest that you engage a range of stakeholders as partners and reach out and offer opportunities to coordinate services. The Plan for Looking Forward can help you identify and layout activities for building and maintaining collaborations.

SDP Feedback Form (Sample)

[Note: You can adapt this form for an online survey or use it as a feedback form that you disseminate by email.]

Thank you for agreeing to review the Migrant Education Program (MEP) Service Delivery Plan (SDP) for [State Name]. Development of an effective SDP is a process that benefits from input and feedback from a variety of stakeholders. By responding to the questions on this feedback form, you will provide important information that enables the planning team to improve the SDP so that it is a relevant and usable plan for ensuring that migratory children have the support to access and succeed in educational opportunities and reach state education performance targets.

After reading the SDP, please respond to the following statements by [deadline]. If you have any questions or are unable to provide your responses by the deadline, please call or email me.

Sincerely,

[State Director’s Name, Title, Email, Phone Number]

Name of Reviewer:________________________ Title/Position:____________
Program or Agency Represented:___________

Please respond to the following statements by indicating the most appropriate rating. Any additional comments that you can provide related to the strengths or areas of needed improvement for these features of the SDP would be greatly appreciated.

Evaluation Scale:     (5) Strongly Agree    (4) Agree    (3) Neutral     (2) Disagree     (1) Strongly Disagree

  1. The SDP was clearly written and easy to read.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP shows a clear understanding of federal requirements guiding the development of the plan.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP shows clear alignment of state performance targets, needs assessment, service delivery strategies, Measurable Program Outcomes (MPOs), and evaluation.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The Need and Concern Statements depict the full range of needs (both instructional and non-instructional) of migratory children.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The strategies clearly relate to the MPOs.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The MPOs provide a concrete picture of the results that the MEP hopes to achieve.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The evaluation questions form the basis of a strong Evaluation Plan that measures both implementation and results.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The project plan is sufficiently detailed to operationalize the strategies.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. Migratory children identified to receive Priority for Services are targeted throughout the plan.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The Identification & Recruitment Plan will ensure that sound eligibility determinations are made.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The parental involvement plan ensures that parents of migratory children receive the support they need to be involved in their children’s education.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP includes a plan for requesting and transferring student records efficiently.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP includes strategies to foster ongoing communication with local projects.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP includes a detailed plan for providing technical assistance to local projects.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The local granting process will require applicants to plan their program based on the MPOs and strategies in the SDP.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP includes a plan for monitoring local projects.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The plans for communicating the SDP to local projects will likely create buy-in.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The plans for revisiting the SDP will ensure that it remains flexible and relevant.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

  1. The SDP includes strategies for coordination and collaboration with key programs and agencies.

    Strengths:

    Areas in need of improvement:

5

4

3

2

1

Please provide any additional comments related to the overall effectiveness of the SDP:

Submit this form to:
[Contact Name, Email]

Collaborations to Build or Maintain (Template)

Program or Agency

How Should the Program or Agency Be Involved?

What Migrant Education Services Are Available?

Program Contact

Connections in Place

Connections Needed

Next Steps

G.2. Revising and Updating the SDP

Revisiting the SDP with the Planning Team

It is important to periodically revisit your SDP to monitor progress and make adjustments. We suggest that you maintain the involvement of the planning team (or representatives from the stakeholder groups that were involved in the SDP development if the original members cannot continue). You should provide periodic updates on formative evaluation data or emerging issues.

The ongoing involvement of the MEP evaluator will ensure that you receive formative data on both the implementation and results of the SDP. Formative data will help identify issues that you can examine and address early in the implementation process.

We suggest scheduling a face-to-face meeting of the planning team at least annually to examine the progress, evolution, and direction of the SDP. These meetings provide an opportunity to hear directly from the local projects responsible for implementation. Representatives from LOAs can report on which aspects of the SDP are working and the challenges they may face in its implementation. With this information, the planning team can recommend adjustments to the SDP to improve its effectiveness.

Examine the following questions with the planning team:

  • What additional support is needed at the local level?
  • What problems have you encountered so far?
  • Have programs been implemented as planned? If not, why not?

Remember that an effective SDP is more than just a well-written plan. It guides an ongoing process of collaborative, strategic problem solving. Change is a lengthy process, however, and it may take years to achieve full implementation of the SDP and optimum results. You do not want to maintain an outdated plan, but you also do not want to make significant changes to strategies before they have been implemented fully for maximum impact. In other words, do not make changes to the SDP too rapidly because you need time for impacts to occur.

We suggest that you include in the SDP a timeline for periodically reconvening the planning team in face-to-face meetings or other types of communication, such as conference calls and emails. You may want to work with the MEP evaluator to establish certain benchmarks for implementation and results. If you are not meeting the short-term benchmarks, explore reasons with the planning team and consider possible changes to the SDP.

Considerations for Small States

If you are unable to reconvene the planning team for input on updating the SDP, we suggest that you convene stakeholders in focus groups at national or state conferences for this purpose. An annual online survey of key stakeholders is another strategy for gathering information that would inform an update to the SDP.

Keeping Abreast of Change and Emerging Issues

In addition to reviewing the SDP for progress on implementation and results, we suggest that you revisit the SDP regularly (at a minimum, annually) to review it in light of any changes in policies, demographic trends, or new issues that have emerged.

Further, we recommend that you keep abreast of any changes and information (e.g., new statutory requirements, regulations, or non-regulatory guidance) that come from the federal level and changes in state performance targets/measurements of interim progress.

You can stay informed by

  • attending national conferences and state program conferences;
  • attending migrant education conferences or conferences on related topics;
  • participating in migrant education listservs;
  • communicating frequently with collaborators, local MEP staff, parents, and other stakeholders;
  • serving on relevant task forces; and
  • visiting the RESULTS Web site.

Use your data submitted to the U.S. Department of Education through the Consolidated State Performance Report every two to three years to analyze demographic and academic trends of your population of migratory children. States are experiencing significant changes in the number of migratory children and in the characteristics of those children. It is critical that you re-evaluate the needs of migratory children, identify available resources, and make appropriate adjustments to your processes and services.

We suggest that you include in the SDP the activities in which State MEP staff will participate to keep abreast of migrant trends and emerging issues.

Updating the SDP

Section 1306(a)(2) requires that States periodically review and revise the plan to reflect changes in the State’s strategies and programs. The SEA should update the SDP when the SEA

  • updates the statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA);
  • changes the performance targets or measurable outcomes;
  • changes the services that the MEP will provide statewide; or
  • changes the evaluation design.

The Guidance recommends updating the CNA every three to five years, which means that you should update your SDP with the same frequency. Keep in mind that the SDP is part of a Continuous Program Improvement Cycle, which includes continual review of the CNA and Evaluation Plan. If the CNA results indicate substantial change in the demographics of the migratory child population, for instance, that would imply a need to update the SDP in response to these changes even if it is less than three years old.

We recommend that you indicate in the SDP the target dates for repeating the cycle of assessing needs, creating an SDP, and conducting an evaluation.

Plan for Looking Forward (Template)

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Activity

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Communicating the Service Delivery Plan to local projects

  • [List activities]

Communicating the Service Delivery Plan to other stakeholders

  • [List activities]

Revisiting the Service Delivery Plan with the planning team

  • [List activities]

Updating the Plan

  • [List activities]

Building and maintaining partnerships

  • [List activities]

Section H: Ensuring Implementation and Accountability in Local Programs

Section H: Overview

The process of planning a Service Delivery Plan (SDP) at the State Migrant Education Program (MEP) level should be mirrored at the local level. Local operating agencies (LOAs) should conduct a needs assessment and identify unique needs and concerns relative to their population of migratory children, focusing, in particular, on the subpopulations targeted in the State SDP. Local projects are accountable for contributing to state performance goals. LOAs adopt the strategies the SEA has identified. Although an SEA may fund a local MEP project that addresses different needs than those the SEA identified in its SDP, the SEA must first ensure that the LOA has sufficiently addressed the needs the SEA has identified in its SDP. It is in the SEA’s discretion to fund a project that proposes to address other identified unique educational needs of migratory children, if funds are available for this purpose and if services to address these needs are not available from another funding source. Because the bulk of direct services for migratory children are provided at the local level, the LOA plays a critical role in implementing the strategies the MEP has identified for achieving state performance targets and measurements of interim progress.

Specific strategies for communication with and technical assistance for LOAs are not required in the SDP, but many SDPs include such a section to outline ways to ensure local accountability for the SDP. The following information and resources can help you plan for local project monitoring and provide technical assistance and support to LOAs.

H.1 The SDP at the Local Level

H.2. Engaging and Supporting Local Projects

H.1 The SDP at the Local Level

Setting Expectations and Guiding SDP Implementation Through the Local Granting Process

The SDP is implemented at the local level through grants to local projects. The State MEP can use the grantmaking process as a means of ensuring that LOAs are implementing their programs in accordance with the SDP. 34 C.F.R. § 200.83(c) requires the SEA to ensure its local operating agencies comply with the plan. In your requirements for local project applications, you can establish an expectation for what LOAs must address to receive funding. Critical components of the local project application include:

  • local needs assessment;
  • assurance that the local project will work to achieve the state MPOs and implement the strategies in the SDP;
  • additional or alternate strategies (if the local data show that the needs of migratory children in the community do not match those identified in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment);
  • activities to put the strategies into operation, included in a project plan;
  • an evaluation and data collection plan; and
  • a budget.

To encourage projects to submit strong applications whose activities clearly align with the performance targets, MPOs, and strategies identified in the SDP, consider providing information to applicants as to how applications will be evaluated on these elements and alignment among them. You may also want to consider, if grantees want to amend their original plan after award, asking them to submit a request explaining the rationale for the change and providing supporting data which outlines how the proposed change aligns with the SDP.

You will likely want to require awardees to provide documentation of implementation of the SDP and impact so that you can determine program progress. An annual update, formative evaluation, or end-of-year report from local programs should address questions such as, “Did the LOA implement the activities as they were outlined in the application?” and “What student outcomes did the program achieve?” In addition, the report can include what the LOA proposes to do differently the following year and the technical assistance it needs from the state level. The data required should reflect the questions in the Evaluation Plan to facilitate the MEP evaluation (see the Program Evaluation Toolkit). The State MEP should include a template outlining the information LOAs are required to provide in the end-of-year report.

Recommendations for SDP Planning Team Meeting: Planning Local Monitoring and Support (Reference)

Meeting #4

Purpose

Outcomes

Develop strategies to ensure implementation and accountability in local projects.

Plans for

  • communication with local projects;
  • technical assistance and training;
  • local granting processes; and
  • local monitoring.

Suggestions:

  • Convene a meeting that includes directors from a range of local migrant projects to explore what type of support they need to implement the SDP.
  • Conduct a focus group of local directors at a state or national migrant conference.

Follow Up:

  • Use recommendations from meeting and focus groups for the section of the SDP on communicating with and providing technical assistance to local projects; provide a draft of the section for review by local project directors.
  • Plan an annual survey of local project directors to determine their technical assistance needs for SDP implementation.

Considerations for Small States

Small states are at a distinct advantage when it comes to the State Director having frequent contact with a limited number of local projects and developing supportive relationships with the local project directors. We encourage you to develop these collegial relationships where local projects can network among themselves as well as with the State MEP.

H.2. Engaging and Supporting Local Projects

Ongoing Communication with Local Projects

As in any collaborative initiative, relationship building is key, and good collaborative relationships are not built overnight. Many State Directors have close working relationships with their LOAs, and the local programs look to them as a source of guidance and support.

Continual contact is an effective way to build the collaboration with LOAs and reinforce implementation of the SDP as well as to stay abreast of challenges and emerging issues. Consider the following strategies for ongoing communication with LOAs:

  • Bimonthly conference calls
  • Listserv or email distribution list
  • Web site
  • State meeting at the national conference
  • Quarterly newsletter
  • Yearly visits to LOAs

In the SDP, include strategies for ongoing communication with local projects.

Technical Assistance

Planning Professional Development

A technical assistance plan for the LOAs should offer resources and training opportunities accessible to every local program director and staff. Consider the following technical assistance strategies:

  • Develop a comprehensive list of national and state resources to provide to local programs.
  • Offer training related to the strategies in the SDP. To determine appropriate training topics, consider for each service delivery strategy in the SDP the question, “What professional development will LOAs need to build their capacity to provide services as specified in the SDP?”
  • Identify professional development opportunities in other state or federal programs that would benefit local MEP staff and provide local programs with an annual schedule of training.
  • Provide training on evidence-based strategies.
  • Train local project staff on aspects of program planning that mirror the process for developing the SDP. Staff in local programs in many cases lack expertise in reviewing data and identifying needs, identifying strategies, aligning program components, involving parents, and evaluating their program. Developing local expertise in these areas helps build capacity for effective program planning at the local level.

We suggest that in the SDP you include a list of MEP-funded professional development opportunities for local projects that the State MEP will provide, as well as those that may be available through other programs or conferences.

Developing a System for Providing Customized Technical Assistance to Specific LOAs

Having a systematic way to identify LOAs that need technical assistance will enable you to target help where it is most needed. Consider the following strategies that State MEPs use:

  • Review local program data annually, and identify programs that do not meet project goals.
  • Develop a technical assistance request form that LOAs can submit to the MEP.
  • Develop a self-assessment form that local projects can use to determine their needs for technical assistance.

The SDP should include the process the State MEP will use to identify LOAs that need customized technical assistance.