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New Directors' Orientation Tutorial

The New Directors' Orientation Tutorial is made up of 14 self-paced modules to assist in learning basic program requirements. Each module is designed to be utilized based on a Director’s specific needs; there is not a set sequence for the tutorial to be completed. We encourage Directors to jump to the module that best fits their needs. Select a module below to view or download the corresponding materials.

Section 1: Getting Started

Getting Started
In This Section
Tutorial Objectives
How to Use the Tutorial
Icons to Guide You
Key Readings and Resources
3
Tutorial Objectives
Module 5 will enable new state directors to
1. understand the purpose for establishing state and local migrant
Parent Advisory Councils (PACs),
2. support local operating agencies (LOAs) in establishing PACs,
3. establish an effective State PAC,
4. foster increased involvement of migrant parents in their childrens
education, and
5. develop an action plan for parental involvement.
4
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should
allow sufficient time to read the slides, reflect on the information, and
complete all activities on the slides or on the Quick Resource and
Reflection Sheets (QRRS) that can be downloaded as worksheets;
read each slide as well as the information referenced in the slides;
engage with the “What Do You Think?” slides to facilitate interaction
with the information (Answers will be provided directly following each
of these slides.);
5
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should (continued)
Pause to reflect on your state program at the “Check-in” slides
(A QRRS document will typically accompany these.);
Complete the “Pop Quiz!” slides to reinforce key concepts;
Review your state’s Migrant Education Program (MEP) documents and
reports as directed;
Develop an action plan using the worksheets provided;
Add actionable items to your MEP planning calendar (See QRRS
14.2.); and
Contact your MEP Officer for follow-up questions.
6
Icons to Guide You
The following icons will guide you in making the best use of this tutorial:
What Do You Think?
Check-in
Pop Quiz!
Quick Reference and Reflection Sheet (QRRS)
Action Planning
Calendar Item
7
Key Readings and Resources
You should have these documents readily available while completing
the module, as the module will refer to these documents for more
complete information on various topics.
MEP Guidance on the Education of Migratory Children under Title I,
Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965,
Chapter VII
Your states migrant Parent Involvement Plan, often located in the
Service Delivery Plan (SDP)
Your states Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)
8

Section 2: What is Required

What is Required
9
What is Required
Parent Advisory Councils
In the planning and operation of programs at both the state and LOA
level, there is consultation with PACs for programs of one school year
in duration.
The SEA must develop its comprehensive state plan in consultation
with the state PAC.
Sections 1304(c)(3) of
Title I Part C of the ESEA, as amended
34 CFR § 200.83(b)
10
What is Required
Parental Involvement (other than the PAC)
SEAs and LOAs are required to plan and operate the MEP in a manner
that provides for the same parental involvement as is required in
Section 1118 of the ESEA, unless extraordinary circumstances make
such provision impractical;
The statute also requires parental involvement activities to be
conducted in a format and language understandable to parents.
Section 1118 of Title I Part A, and
Section 1304(c)(3) of Title I Part C of the ESEA, as amended
11
Check-in
Where is your state’s migrant parent involvement plan located? (SEAs
could include a parent involvement plan in the SDP as a promising
practice.)
What do you know about your state’s plan to
1. Consult with parents in planning and operating the MEP,
2. Oversee and support effective PACs in LOAs, and
3. Involve migrant parents in their children’s education?
See QRRS 5.1 Migrant Parental Involvement in Your State
12

Section 3: Migrant Parent Advisory Councils

Migrant Parent
Advisory Councils
In This Section
The Role of Migrant Parent
Advisory Councils
Establishing the Parent Advisory
Council
Effective Parent Advisory Council
Meetings
State Migrant Education Support
for Local Operating Agency Parent
Advisory Councils
13
The Role of Migrant Parent Advisory Councils
Migrant parents play a pivotal role in planning the educational
programs and projects in which their children participate.
The empowerment that results from migrant parents providing input
on policies and procedures of migrant programs and services can lead
to better educational outcomes for their children and overall
improvements to the migrant family and community.
14
The Role of Migrant Parent Advisory Councils
There are many benefits to involving parents in the planning process for
migrant programs.
Parents can provide insights into the strengths and weakness of their
children to inform program needs.
Including parents will build their capacity to assist their children’s
learning at home.
Parents’ understanding of the MEP will improve.
Including parents will facilitate their communication with school staff
concerning their children’s education.
Parents’ support and advocacy of the MEP will increase.
15
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The State PAC advises the SEA on concerns of migrant parents that
relate to the planning, operation, and evaluation of MEP programs and
projects.
The SEA must consult with the PAC about:
1. The statewide comprehensive assessment of the needs of migratory
children to be served,
2. The comprehensive State plan for service delivery, and
3. The process and results of the statewide program evaluation
Programs of less than one school year in duration, e.g., summer-only
programs, do not require the consultation of the PAC. However, they
must consult with migrant parents in developing their comprehensive
State plan for service delivery.
16
The Role of the Local Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The local PAC advises the LOA on concerns of migrant parents that
relate to the planning, operation, and evaluation of the local MEP
project.
The LOA must consult with the local PAC about:
1. The local comprehensive assessment of the needs of migratory
children to be served,
2. The local comprehensive plan for service delivery (local program
application), and
3. The process and results of the local program evaluation
17
The Role of the Local Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
Local projects that do not last a full school year, e.g., they only operate
during the fall harvest season, do not require the consultation of the
PAC, but should include the input of migrant parents in planning and
operating their projects.
18
Establishing the Parent Advisory Council
Those eligible to serve on PACs, include
Parents or guardians of eligible migrant children, and
Individuals who represent the interests of such parents, such as
o SEA or LOA personnel,
o District Title I or Title III staff,
o Teachers and other school staff who work with migrant children,
such as counselors or migrant parent liaisons, and
o Recruiters.
19
Establishing the Parent Advisory Council
While MEP funds may be used to reimburse PAC parents or
guardians of eligible migrant children for lost wages incurred in
attending a PAC meeting, the statute does not authorize LOAs to pay
wages to a parent to attend a meeting or training session, or to
reimburse a parent for salary lost due to attendance at general
local parental involvement activities. Nor may MEP funds be used to
reimburse PAC members who are not parents or guardians of
eligible migrant children for lost wages.
20
Effective Parent Advisory Council Meetings
At the first PAC meeting, establish leadership roles, processes for
determining who will serve in roles, time of service, and
responsibilities. Some typical PAC leadership roles include:
o PAC president or chair,
o PAC vice-president or co-chair,
o Treasurer, and
o Secretary.
Some additional roles to consider, include:
o Meeting Whip to incorporate activities that will build team cohesiveness
and productivity and/or
o Time Keeper to help the president or chair keep the meeting moving
forward in order to ensure agenda topics are addressed.
21
Effective Parent Advisory Council Meetings
Establish meeting protocols and responsibilities.
Send out meeting agendas with stated meeting outcomes and
applicable resources well enough in advance so that members come
to meetings prepared to achieve intended outcomes.
Establish rules of conduct and procedures to help ensure that all
members have a voice and to facilitate orderly and effective meetings.
o Visit the Roberts Rules of Order website for one way to conduct
meetings. http://www.robertsrules.org/
22
Effective Parent Advisory Council Meetings
Periodically changing the roles among team members (especially
those who will serve on the team for an extended period of time or
across numerous meetings) can set the stage for increased
engagement, buy-in, and shared responsibility and leadership.
Understanding the expertise and perspective that members bring to
the team is important for establishing effective workgroups.
23
Pop Quiz!
Statement
True
False
1
SEAs are required to include parents in the comprehensive needs
assessment process.
2
Consultation with
the PAC is required for both long-term and short-
term
MEP
activities and services.
3
Only parents of migrant children
can serve on PACs.
4
Periodically changing roles among PAC members creates greater
engagement in PAC meetings.
5
LOAs
can reimburse parents for wages lost for attending non-PAC
training sessions.
Instructions: Review your understanding of the participation of
migrant parents on PACs. Check whether the following statements are
True or False.
24
Pop Quiz! - Response
ü
Statements 1, and 4 are TRUE.
û Statement 2 is FALSE.
Short-term projects that do not last a full school year (e.g., a
remedial math tutoring program that is only offered during the first
semester of school) do not require the consultation of the PAC but
should include the input of migrant parents.
û Statement 3 is FALSE.
Individuals that represent the interests of migrant parents may
serve on the PAC in addition to migrant parents.
25
Pop Quiz! - Response
û
Statement 5 is FALSE.
While MEP funds may be used to reimburse PAC parents or
guardians of eligible migrant children for lost wages incurred in
attending a PAC meeting, the statute does not authorize LOAs to
pay wages to a parent to attend a non-PAC meeting or training
session or to reimburse a parent for salary lost due to attendance
at general parental involvement activities.
26
State Migrant Education Program Support for
Local Operating Agency Migrant Parent
Advisory Councils
The SEA sets the expectation for the local projects to establish PACs.
The SEA has the option to include a section on parental involvement in
the SDP; this section could include specific strategies for supporting
LOAs in establishing PACs, such as
o Providing information, training, and technical assistance to local
projects in establishing PACs
27
State Migrant Education Program Support for
Local Operating Agency Migrant Parent
Advisory Councils
Additional suggested inclusions in the SDP to support LOAs in
developing PACs are:
Ways that local project applications will include information on the
establishment, membership, and operation of the PAC;
Ways the MEP local monitoring and project evaluation processes will
include a review of local PACs; and
Strategies for ensuring that local PACs will inform the state PAC and
MEP program planning.
28
State Migrant Education Program Support for
Local Operating Agency Migrant Parent
Advisory Councils
Strategies to help ensure that local PACs are effective and engaged with
the priorities of the MEP goals and objectives include:
Defining the purpose of PACs, including mission statement or by-laws
(if they exist); and
Disseminating this information to all LOAs.
oConsider posting to the state MEP web site.
oDisseminate in a format and language understandable to all
parents.
29

Section 4: State Migrant Parent Advisory Councils

State Migrant Parent
Advisory Councils
In This Section
The Role of State Migrant Parent
Advisory Council
Establishing the State Migrant Parent
Advisory Council
30
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The primary role of the State PAC is to provide consultative advice to the
SEA on MEP activities.
Migrant parents and guardians can provide insight into the unique
educational, health, and cultural needs that migrant children have.
State PAC members should be representative of the migrant
community, serving as advocates for the educational needs of migrant
children as well as for MEP activities and services.
31
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
32
State
PAC
State
MEP
CNA
MEP Eval
SDP
Local
PAC
LOA MEP
activities
& services
Migrant
Community
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The State PAC’s role in needs sensing:
A key role for the State PAC is to provide input on the CNA, since this
information will define the direction of MEP services and activities,
thus helping to ensure the educational needs of eligible migrant
children are met. PAC members bring:
o Understanding of the migrant culture,
o Insights about the unique experiences and needs of migrant
children, and
o Understanding of the barriers to their children’s education.
33
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The State PAC’s role in needs sensing:
To maximize input on the CNA, include PAC members on the Needs
Assessment Committee (NAC) in various roles to provide input and
assist with:
o Creating a migrant profile,
o Identifying concerns and
writing need indicators,
o Developing a data collection
plan,
o Analyzing data,
o Proposing MEP services and
activities,
o Reviewing the CNA report,
and
o Communicating the CNA
findings and
recommendations.
For information on developing the CNA, see Module 6: Comprehensive Needs
Assessment.
34
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
Continuity with the The State PAC’s role in MEP planning:
As the SEA transitions from conducting the CNA to developing the SDP,
PAC members should be included at various stages, as they will be
able to contribute:
o Needs sensing process,
o Additional information about migrant children and youth in the
state,
o Unique feedback about proposed program initiatives, and
o Ideas for delivery of services.
For information on developing the SDP, see Module 7: Service Delivery Plan.
35
The Role of the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The State PAC’s role in MEP evaluation
PAC members should be included in the MEP evaluation process.
Some key roles include providing:
o Input and review of data collection instruments for
§ Clarity,
§ Linguistic and/or cultural understanding, and
§ Types of instruments and venues for collecting data; and
o Feedback on data findings and inferences.
For information on developing an MEP evaluation plan, see Module 8:
Program Evaluation
36
Establishing the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The MEP should establish procedures for selecting State PAC members
that may include:
Utilizing a process that fits best with the state’s migrant education
needs, whether it be election, nomination, appointment, and/or
volunteerism;
Ensuring that the State PAC is representative of the statewide migrant
community;
Including LOA PAC representation; and
Establishing the time commitment required to serve on the PAC (e.g.,
some states set a three-year term for state migrant PAC members).
37
Establishing the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
The MEP should:
Identify the number of representatives and role groups to be
represented, and, specifically, the number of migrant parents to serve
on the PAC;
o The size of the PAC will vary depending on the size of your state
MEP and the migrant child population in each LOA;
o Membership should reflect a cross-section of the migrant
community across the state; and
o Some states open PAC meetings to all migrant parents, but limit
voting rights to PAC members.
Note: Having PAC members take time to assign the right people to the right tasks (rather
than just accepting volunteers) can improve the overall productivity of teams.
38
Establishing the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
To ensure effective operation of the State PAC, the MEP should:
Define responsibilities of PAC members, such as those who will:
o Serve in an advisory capacity to the MEP,
o Participate in meetings for state and local PACs,
o Participate in CNA and SDP development teams,
o Provide support to local PACs and migrant parents, and
o Provide MEP support and advocacy; and
39
Establishing the State Migrant Parent Advisory
Council
To ensure effective operation of the State PAC, the MEP should:
(continued)
Identify other activities that support the work of the state PAC, such as
o State conference for state and local PACs,
o Professional learning and training opportunities,
o MEP planning involvement, and
o MEP community involvement.
40
Check-in
How effectively does your state PAC work?
See QRRS 5.2 Developing an Effective State PAC
41

Section 5: Non-PAC Parental Involvement

Non-PAC Parental
Involvement
In This Section
Importance of Parental Involvement
Parental Involvement as Described in
Section 1118 of the ESEA
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant
Parental Involvement
Coordinating Migrant Parental
Involvement Efforts
State MEP Support for Migrant
Parental Involvement
42
Importance of Parental Involvement
Parents play a significant role in the academic achievement of their
children. Therefore, it is important for parents and schools to develop
partnerships and build ongoing dialogues to improve student
achievement.
43
Parental Involvement as Described in Section
1118 of the ESEA
Parent involvement provisions in the ESEA reinforce:
Accountability of both schools and parents for student achievement;
Local development of parental involvement plans with sufficient
flexibility to address local needs; and
Building parents’ capacity for using effective practices to improve their
own childrens academic achievement.
44
Parental Involvement as Described in Section
1118 of the ESEA
LEA and school requirements for parental involvement include:
Developing a written parental involvement policy at the LEA and
school level;
Involving parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely way in the
planning, review, and improvement of programs and the school
parental involvement policy;
Providing information to parents about programs, curriculum, and
academic assessment;
45
Parental Involvement as Described in Section
1118 of the ESEA
Developing a school-parent compact in order to share the
responsibility for high student academic achievement;
Building the capacity of parents and school staff for strong parental
involvement; and
Ensuring access to parental involvement activities.
Section 1118 of the ESEA
For detailed strategies for enacting these requirements, see Parental
Involvement: Title I, Part A Non-regulatory Guidance, 2004
46
What Do You Think?
Can you think of five unique barriers to the involvement of migrant
parents in their children’s education?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
47
What Do You Think? Reflection
Did your list include some of the following common barriers?
Limited English proficiency
Lack of transportation
Demanding work schedules (especially during peak harvesting
seasons)
Lack of familiarity with school policies and procedures (especially for
course requirements for graduation)
Lack of confidence engaging with teachers or administrators
48
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Provide clear and ongoing communication and advocacy for
improving the education of migrant children.
Consider
Identifying communication needs and develop strategies for reaching
target audiences with relevant message/information, and
Using multiple modes and locations for communicating, such as via:
o Website,
o Email distribution lists,
o Social media (e.g., Facebook
and Twitter)
o Employer sites,
o Grocery stores, and
o Student and parent school packets.
49
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Ensure access and transportation to meetings.
Consider
Providing access to information about public transportation,
Using school buses to transport parents to school for Parent Teacher
Organization (PTO) meetings,
Holding events at locations other than the school (e.g., local libraries,
employer locations), and
Using funds to cover costs that are reasonable and necessary to
support the attendance of migrant parents at workshops and
conferences that enable them to participate more effectively in the
local program or to conduct home-based educational activities.
50
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Plan meeting times and other training events around migrant
parents’ work schedules.
Consider
Holding meetings near or at employer locations,
Creating alternative schedules for holding meetings,
Holding multiple training events at different times,
Working with PAC members or other parents to communicate
information from meetings,
51
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
52
Plan meeting times and other training events around migrant
parents’ work schedules. (continued)
Working with PAC members or other parents to communicate
information from meetings,
Posting meeting agendas and minutes on an accessible web page or
print and post at employer locations, and
Providing online training options (if there is reasonable and consistent
access to technology resources, including hardware, software, and
Internet).
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Assist with improving parenting skills, when needed, to
Ensure children attend school nourished and well rested, and
Reinforce the importance of school enrollment and regular
attendance.
Consider
Conducting home visits to reinforce educational requirements and
expectations, and providing tips for helping children with their
homework;
Providing nutrition and general healthcare prevention classes; and
Providing parents with their child’s MSIX consolidated student record
or report card and explaining their content.
53
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Build parents’ literacy skills so that they may more effectively assist
their children with homework and communicate with teachers and
other school staff.
Consider
Implementing family literacy programs, and
Holding parent meetings at local libraries.
54
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Encourage parents who are not fluent in English and may feel
reluctant to contact teachers or attend parent-teach organization
(PTO) or other school-sponsored meetings that could provide them
with resources to support their children’s learning.
Consider
Ensuring schools create welcoming environments for parents with
limited English skills,
Providing school handbooks and memos in languages spoken by
migrant parents,
55
Overcoming Barriers to Migrant Parental
Involvement
Encourage parents who are not fluent in English and may feel
reluctant to contact teachers or attend parent-teach organization
(PTO) or other school-sponsored meetings that could provide them
with resources to support their children’s learning. (continued)
Providing information about local Limited English Proficiency (LEP)
classes for adults, and
Arranging for parents to spend time with teachers visiting in the
Binational Teacher Exchange Program.
56
Coordinating Migrant Parental Involvement
Efforts
Coordinate parent involvement activities with other programs that serve
migrant children and youth, such as Title I, Part A and Title III programs.
Coordination maximizes efficient use of resources.
57
State Migrant Education Program Support for
Migrant Parental Involvement
The state MEP can provide technical assistance for migrant parent
involvement to ensure that LOAs align local efforts with SEA
expectations.
The state MEP Parent Involvement Plan can include strategies for
reinforcing the involvement of migrant parents in their children’s
education at the local level.
o Consider including a plan for how the SEA will provide information,
training, and technical assistance to LOAs, as well as other
programs (school improvement, Title IA, Title III) for involving
migrant parents in their children’s education.
58
State Migrant Education Program Support for
Migrant Parental Involvement
Additional state MEP strategies for supporting migrant parental
involvement include:
Conducting a statewide migrant parent conference.
Requiring a parent involvement plan as part of the local project
application.
Including a local monitoring indicator for parent involvement.
59

Section 6: Wrapping Up

Wrapping Up
In This Section
Key Points
Action Planning
Resources
60
Key Points
Migrant parents can provide insight into the educational, health, and
cultural needs of migrant children.
PACs at the state and LOA level are required to enable parents to
provide input on MEP activities.
SEAs are required to obtain parents’ input on the CNA and SDP.
SEAs and LOAs are required to operate their local MEP projects in a
manner that provides for the same parental involvement as in Section
1118 of the ESEA.
Migrant parents have unique challenges to parental involvement that
should be addressed by the MEP at the state and local level.
61
Action Planning
Consider the following questions.
How can the role of the state and local PACs be maximized to inform
the MEP?
What are the major barriers in my state to parents’ involvement in
their children’s education?
What training or professional development is needed to ensure that
parents have a meaningful role in their children’s education?
62
Action Planning (continued)
In what ways can the SEA coordinate parent involvement activities in
the state among the MEP, Title I, Part A and Title III?
What communication efforts can be implemented to improve parental
understanding of and involvement in MEP services and activities in
order to increase their participation in their children’s education?
See QRRS 5.3 – Parental Involvement Action Planning
Add any actionable items to your MEP planning calendar.
63
Resources for Parental Involvement
MEP Guidance on Education of Migratory Children under Title I, Part
C, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965
Explanation of guidelines to implement the laws and regulations
related to the MEP, Chapter VII
Service Delivery Plan Toolkit Suggested step-by-step guide with tools
and templates for developing a SDP
64
Resources for Parental Involvement
Robert’s Rules of Order A quick reference guide to one way to
establish parliamentary procedures
Parental Involvement: Title I, Part A Non-regulatory Guidance, (2004)
– A document that provides detailed strategies for involving parents in
their children’s education and for improving teaching and learning
65
Migrant Education Program Resources
RESULTS Website MEP resources, including legislation, guidance,
handbooks, toolkits, and links to relevant resources
(https://results.ed.gov)
MEP Officers List of OME contact information
(https://results.ed.gov/about/contact)
MEP State Profiles Includes links to state MEP contact information
(https://results.ed.gov/resources/state_program_information)
Glossary of Terms Alphabetical listing of key terms applicable to
migrant education (https://results.ed.gov/idr-
manual/section/glossary/glossary)
66