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New Directors' Orientation Tutorial

The New Directors' Orientation Tutorial is made up of 14 self-paced modules to assist in learning basic program requirements. Each module is designed to be utilized based on a Director’s specific needs; there is not a set sequence for the tutorial to be completed. We encourage Directors to jump to the module that best fits their needs. Select a module below to view or download the corresponding materials.

Module 7 Icon

7. Program Planning - Service Delivery Plan

Section 1: Getting Started

Getting Started
In This Section
Tutorial Objectives
How to Use the Tutorial
Icons to Guide You
Key Readings and Resources
3
Tutorial Objectives
Module 7 will enable new state directors to
1. understand the legislative and regulatory requirements for the
Service Delivery Plan (SDP),
2. develop an SDP using a recommended framework,
3. develop strong Measurable Program Outcomes (MPOs) for Migrant
Education Program (MEP) services,
4. review their current state SDP to identify ways to improve it, and
5. develop an action plan customized to their state’s MEP for
developing a new SDP or revising their current one.
4
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should
allow sufficient time to read the slides, reflect on the information, and
complete all activities on the slides or on the Quick Resource and
Reflection Sheets (QRRS) that can be downloaded as worksheets;
read each slide as well as the information referenced in the slides;
engage with the “What Do You Think?” slides to facilitate interaction
with the information (Answers will be provided directly following each
of these slides.);
5
How to Use the Tutorial
For optimal benefit from the tutorial, you should (continued)
pause to reflect on your state program at the “Check-in” slides
(A QRRS document will typically accompany these.);
complete the “Pop Quiz!” slides to reinforce key concepts;
review your state’s MEP documents and reports as directed;
develop an action plan using the worksheets provided;
add actionable items to your MEP planning calendar (QRRS 14.2); and
contact your OME Program Officer for follow-up questions.
6
Icons to Guide You
The following icons will guide you in making the best use of this tutorial:
What Do You Think?
Check-in
Pop Quiz!
Quick Reference and Reflection Sheet (QRRS)
Action Planning
Calendar Item
7
Key Readings and Resources
You should have these documents readily available while completing
the module, as the module will refer to these documents for more
complete information on various topics.
MEP Guidance on the Education of Migratory Children under Title I,
Part C of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965,
Chapter IV
Service Delivery Plan Toolkit developed by the Office of Migrant
Education (OME)
Your states Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) and SDP
8

Section 2: What is Required

What is Required
9
In This Section
General Requirements
Authorized Activities
SDP Requirements
General Requirements
State educational agencies (SEAs) must ensure that it and the State’s
local operating agencies (LOAs) identify and address the special
educational needs of migratory children in accordance with a
comprehensive state plan that:
A. Is integrated with other programs,
B. Provides that migratory children will have an opportunity to meet the
same challenging state academic content standards and academic
achievement standards that all children are expected to meet,
C. Specifies measurable program goals and outcomes,
D. Encompasses the full range of available services,
E. Is the product of joint planning, and
F. Provides for the integration of services with those provided by other
programs.
Section 1306(a)(1) of Title I Part C of the ESEA, as amended
10
General Requirements
The comprehensive state plan must:
A. Remain in effect for the duration of the states participation in the
MEP, and
B. Be periodically reviewed and revised by the state to reflect changes
in the state’s strategies and programs in the MEP.
Section 1306(a)(2) of Title I Part C of the ESEA, as amended
11
Authorized Activities
In implementing the comprehensive plan, the SEA, where applicable
through its local education agencies (LEAs), will determine that the
activities to be provided with MEP funds will be used to:
Meet the identified needs of migratory children that result from their
migratory lifestyle, and
Permit these children to participate effectively in school.
Section 1306(b)(1) of Title I Part C of the ESEA, as amended
12
SDP Requirements
The SDP must include:
1. State performance targets
2. A Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CAN)
3. Measurable program Objectives (MPOs)
4. Strategies for service delivery
5. A program evaluation plan
34 CFR § 200.83(a)
13
SDP Requirements
The SDP must be developed in consultation with the State Migrant
Education Parent Advisory Council (PAC) or, for states that do not
operate programs of one school year in duration and therefore not
required to have such a council, with the parents of migrant children.
Each SEA must ensure that its local operating agencies comply with the
SDP.
34 CFR § 200.83(b) and (c)
14

Section 3: Continuous Program Improvement for Service Delivery

Continuous
Program
Improvement for
Service Delivery
15
In This Section
Continuous Improvement Cycle
Making Connections in the Planning
Process
Continuous Improvement Cycle
16
Making Connections in the Planning Process
Program planning is a continuous cycle of needs assessment,
planning services, implementation, and evaluation, which are
described in the SDP.
The SDP planning team will use the results of the CNA to identify
services that will address the needs of migrant students and will
generate a plan to implement the services.
17
Making Connections in the Planning Process
18
The Evaluation will inform
updates of the CNA and
changes in the SDP to
improve results and
implementation.
While the diagram
illustrates a cycle, all
components are
interrelated and can
simultaneously influence
and can be influenced by
one another.

Section 4: Setting the Context for the Service Delivery Plan

Setting the
Context for the
Service Delivery
Plan
In This Section
Definitions
Benefits of Developing a Service
Delivery Plan
Key Role of the Service Delivery
Plan
Additional Inclusions in the Service
Delivery Plan
When to Update the Service
Delivery Plan
Local Projects and the Service
Delivery Plan
19
Definitions
The Service Delivery Plan is a comprehensive state plan for service
delivery that describes the services the SEA will provide on a statewide
basis, on its own or through LOAs, to address the special educational
needs of migrant students.
20
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV, B1
Definitions
What are considered services?
Services are a subset of MEP activities.
Services are educational or educationally related activities that:
1. Directly benefit a migrant child;
2. Address needs of a migrant child consistent with the CNA and SDP;
3. Are grounded in scientifically based research, or in the case of support
services, are a generally accepted practice; and
4. Are designed to enable the program to meet its measurable outcomes
and to contribute to the achievement of the state’s performance
targets.
MEP Guidance, Chapter V, A1
21
Pop Quiz!
Which of the following is not a “service” for migrant children as defined
in the MEP Guidance?
1. Conducting a summer tutoring program for priority for services
students
2. Dropping off pamphlets and books in a migrant camp as a one-time
activity
3. Providing health screenings for migrant children entering preschool
22
Pop Quiz! - Response
If you selected #2, “Dropping off pamphlets and books in a migrant
camp as a one-time activity,” you are correct.
Dropping off pamphlets and books does not necessarily ensure that
migrant children will benefit, nor can the results of the activity be
measured. Moreover, this is not an activity that is grounded in
research or good practice.
23
Benefits of Developing a Service Delivery Plan
The SDP helps the SEA develop and articulate a clear vision of:
1. The needs of migrant children on a statewide basis,
2. The MEP’s measurable outcomes and how they help achieve the
state’s performance targets,
3. The services the MEP will provide on a statewide basis, and
4. The basis for how to evaluate whether and to what degree the
program is effective.
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV, B2
24
Key Role of the Service Delivery Plan
The SEA’s SDP is
The primary tool for designing and communicating the direction of the
program, and
The basis for the use of all MEP funds in the state.
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV, B2
25
Additional Inclusions in the Service Delivery
Plan
In addition to what is required by law to be included in the SDP, SEAs
may also want to include policies and procedures the SEA will
implement to address other administrative and program functions, such
as
1. Priority for services (PFS),
2. Parent involvement,
3. Identification and Recruitment (ID&R), and
4. The State’s plan for requesting, using, and transferring student
records.
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV, B6
Note: Other modules in the New Directors Orientation Tutorial address each of these
topics.
26
When to Update the Service Delivery Plan
The SDP should be updated when the SEA:
1. Updates the CNA,
2. Changes the performance targets and/or MPOs,
3. Changes the services the state MEP will provide, and
4. Changes the evaluation design.
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV, B8
27
Local Projects and the Service Delivery Plan
The SEA must ensure each LOA has sufficiently addressed the needs
identified in the SDP.
The SEA can choose to fund a project that proposes to address other
identified special educational needs of migrant children if funds are
available and if services are not available from another funding
source.
MEP Guidance, Chapter IV, B8
28
Check-in
Review your state SDP and respond to the following questions.
1. When was the SDP developed or revised?
2. Who was involved?
3. Did it include:
o State performance targets,
o A CNA,
o MPOs,
o Service delivery, and
o A program evaluation plan?
See QRRS 7.1 Reviewing Your State SDP
29

Section 5: The Service Delivery Planning Process

The Service
Delivery Planning
Process
In This Section
Joint Planning
Considerations for Utilizing an
External Consultant
Planning Tasks and Timelines
30
Joint Planning
Most states establish a planning team to develop the SDP.
The planning team may be a continuation of the Needs Assessment
Committee (NAC) that developed the CNA.
The size of the planning team may depend on the size of the state
MEP.
31
Joint Planning
Questions to consider for selecting planning team members:
What programs, agencies, or role groups are most involved in serving
migrant students?
What areas of the state or what local programs should be
represented?
What expertise and experience are critical for developing the SDP?
How will parents be involved?
What individuals will be willing to devote significant time and effort to
developing the SDP?
Who should be involved in all phases of the comprehensive planning
process (CNA, SDP, and Program Evaluation) to offer continuity?
32
Joint Planning
Groups to consider:
Federal education program
administrators (Title I, Title III,
IDEA)
Teachers
Community agency
representatives
LOA coordinators
Experts in content areas
Representatives from early
childhood programs
Dropout prevention specialists
PAC members/migrant parents
CNA team members
MEP evaluator
33
Check-in
Top 5 Profiles:
Who are the five members you consider most important to have on the
SDP planning team?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
See QRRS 7.2 Who Should Serve on the SDP Planning Team
34
Considerations for Utilizing an External
Consultant
Some state directors enlist the services of an external consultant to
develop the SDP.
If you choose to hire a consultant, keep in mind that you are
responsible for the SDP and overseeing its development and
implementation.
It is highly recommended that you remain involved throughout the
planning process and communicate frequently with the consultant.
35
Considerations for Utilizing an External
Consultant
Consider the following questions:
Is there a specific component of the SDP planning process with which
you need help, or do you need help with the overall planning process?
For what specific tasks will the consultant be responsible? For what
tasks will you be responsible?
What will your budget allow?
What skills and experiences do you want the consultant to have?
What accountability measures will you put in place to ensure that the
consultant will deliver the product you need?
36
Planning Tasks and Timelines
Suggested strategies:
Identify the date by which you need to complete the SDP and map
backwards to plan tasks and activities.
Define and communicate the responsibilities of the state director and
the planning team.
Schedule a limited number of meetings with the planning team with a
well-planned agenda and specific desired outcomes.
37
See the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit, Sections C and D for sample tasks and
timelines and for sample meeting agendas.

Section 6: General Framework for Developing the Service Delivery Plan

General
Framework for
Developing the
Service Delivery
Plan
In This Section
Alignment of All Parts
State Performance Goals and
Targets
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Service Delivery
Measurable Program Outcomes
Program Evaluation Plan
38
Alignment of All Parts Logic Model Thinking
A logic model is a useful tool to ensure that all parts of a plan are
related and aligned.
Note in the logic model on the next slide how the arrows connect each
component.
o Begin with the State Performance Goals and Targets.
o Follow all components to the left and around.
While each of the components has its own function, the components
must be linked to provide a cohesive and consistent approach to
enable migrant students to achieve state performance goals and
targets.
39
Alignment of All
Parts Logic
Model Thinking
40
Alignment of All Parts
“Testing the logic” Review each component of your state SDP, and
ask, If this condition or component exists, then does the condition or
component to which it is connected logically follow?”
41
For more on a logic model, see the Service Delivery Plan
Toolkit, Section C.2.
Alignment of All Parts
An Alignment Chart will help you see the extent to which all parts of
your state SDP are connected.
A key activity for understanding the General Framework is to complete
QRRS 7.3 for one of your state performance goals as the module
presents information on each of the required components of the SDP
in the following slides.
See QRRS 7.3 Alignment Chart
42
State Performance Goals and Targets
Performance goals are broad statements of the results that states
are seeking to achieve for all students; performance targets are
measurable results that can be viewed as benchmarks of progress
toward meeting these goals.
SEAs describe their performance goals and targets in their
Consolidated State Application (CSA) or in the current version of their
approved ESEA Flexibility Requests. (See Module 3 for more
information on the Consolidated State Application.)
43
State Performance Goals and Targets
The SDP must specify performance targets that the state has adopted
for all children in the areas of:
o Reading,
o Math,
o High school graduation, and
o Any other performance targets that the state has identified for
migrant children (e.g., school readiness).
Migrant students should be held to the same high standards as all
students in the state.
44
State Performance Goals and Targets
State performance targets guide the development of all subsequent
parts of the SDP.
The purpose of the SDP is to provide the strategies, implementation
support, and accountability to ensure that migrant students can
achieve the state performance targets.
45
State Performance Goals and Targets
Note the following example of a state performance target that fits into
the Alignment Chart.
GOAL AREA: READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS
State
Performance
Target
The number of students who attain proficiency in reading and
language arts will increase by at least five percentage points
each year until all students attain proficiency
by 2014.
46
Putting into Practice
Select a goal area and state performance target for your state and enter
it in the Alignment Chart in QRRS 7.3. (We will revisit the Alignment
Chart throughout the module.)
See QRRS 7.3 - Alignment Chart
47
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
The CNA should provide you with:
A profile of migrant students in your state;
The needs of migrant students, specifically the gap between what is
(their performance in the goal areas required in the CSA) and what
should be (state performance targets);
Concern and Need Statements that address underlying causes in
gaps in performance, supported by data; and
Recommendations for research-based strategies to select for the SDP.
48
Check-in
Reviewing your state CNA:
While OME recommends a process for the CNA described in the MEP
Guidance and outlined in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Toolkit, state approaches to the CNA may vary widely.
A review of the information provided in your state CNA will assist you
with determining the process for developing the SDP.
See QRRS 7.4 CNA Summary
49
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Building on the Alignment Chart:
Note in the following slide how the information from the CNA can assist
with building the Alignment Chart.
See Module 6 for more information on the components of the Alignment
Chart recommended in the CNA.
50
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
GOAL AREA: READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS
State Performance
Target
The number of students who attain proficiency in reading and
language arts will increase by at least five percentage points each
year until all students attain proficiency
by 2014.
Concern Statement
We are concerned that migrant students do not
receive sufficient
instructional time to achieve proficiency in reading/language arts
due to their high mobility and school absences.
Data Summary
In school year 2012, in grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of
migrant students attaining proficient or advanced in
reading/language arts was 73.2%, compared to the percentage
for all students of 86.7%.
In school year 2012, in grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of
migrant students who were absent 10 or more days (defined as
priority for service students) was 53%.
Needs Statements
In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migrant students
attaining proficient or advanced in reading/language arts needs
to increase by 13.5% to perform on par with other students.
In grades 3, 8, and 11, priority for service students need to
increase their instructional time by approximately 60 hours.
51
Putting into Practice
Revisit QRRS 7.3 to complete the Concern Statement, Data Summary,
and Need Statement portion of the Alignment Chart you are developing
for this module.
You may find this information in your state CNA, but if you dont, for
the sake of understanding how the alignment process works,
complete the chart with hypothetical information.
52
Service Delivery
The SDP must include research-based strategies that target the
identified needs of migrant students, particularly those identified as
priority for services.
The CNA, if it was developed according to the process recommended
in the MEP Guidance, should provide recommendations for research-
based strategies.
The planning team should review these strategies, or identify other
research-based strategies, and select those that target the needs
identified in the CNA.
53
Service Delivery
Services may include a range of strategies, including:
Direct instructional services,
Support services to enable children to participate effectively in school,
State-level initiatives, and
Local project initiatives.
54
What Do You Think?
Revisit the needs identified in Slide 51.
1. Can you think of an example of a direct instructional service strategy
for reading and language arts?
2. Can you think of an example of a support service to address the
needs identified above?
55
Need
Statements
In grades 3, 8, and 11, the percentage of migrant
students attaining proficient or advanced in
reading/language arts needs to increase by 13.5% to
perform on par with other students.
In grades 3, 8, and 11, priority for service students need
to increase their instructional time by approximately 60
hours.
What Do You Think? - Reflection
Were your responses similar to the examples below?
1. Examples of direct instructional service strategies:
o Research-based supplemental reading program
o After school tutoring program
2. Example of support strategies:
o Parent conference after a student is absent three days
o Coordination with health services for medical screenings for
students who miss three days due to illness
56
Service Delivery
Strategy Selection Consider the following:
Extent to which the strategy addresses a critical need identified in the
CNA;
Likelihood the proposed solution will reduce the gap between “what
should be” and “what is”;
Research base or grounding in good practice;
Appropriateness of the proposed solution for migrant students in your
state;
Feasibility of implementing the strategy (cost, training, resources);
57
Service Delivery
Strategy Selection Consider the following (continued):
Whether the strategy will address a need that will only increase in
severity if not addressed early;
Whether it addresses a root cause of poor academic performance;
and
Whether the strategy can supplement, or be supplemented by, existing
programs.
58
Service Delivery
Note that strategies should be written in enough detail to facilitate the
development of specific MPOs and evaluation questions that can help
identify areas of needed improvement. See the example below:
Each year, beginning in 2013, local projects will provide opportunities
for migrant students identified as priority for services to participate in
at least 60 hours of instructional time in reading/language arts
beyond the school day through supplemental activities, such as after
school or summer programs.
59
Putting into Practice
Revisit QRRS 7.3, and select strategies from your state CNA (or
propose hypothetical strategies) that address the needs identified on
the Alignment Chart you are developing.
Ensure that
o The strategies can pass the “if-then” logic model test (“if this
need exists, then this strategy directly addresses this need”
review Slide 40),
o The strategies were selected after reviewing the considerations
listed on Slides 57 and 58, and
o The strategies are specific and measurable.
60
Service Delivery
Strategies must be selected for each of the needs identified in the
CNA.
An Alignment Chart for each goal area and state performance target
that includes all needs related to that target provides a systematic way
to ensure that the SDP is comprehensive and linked to student
performance.
Although the Alignment Chart is a planning tool, it can also be
included in the written SDP to show the connection between
strategies, needs, and performance targets.
61
Measurable Program Outcomes
Measurable Program Outcomes: The results the MEP hopes to achieve
at the state and LOA level through the provision of specific educational
or educationally related services.
MEP Guidance, Chapter VIII, B1
62
Measurable Program Outcomes
Key components of an MPO define:
Which students will directly benefit from a service,
What service will be provided,
What is expected to happen as a result of participation in the MEP
services, and
In what time frame this will occur.
63
Measurable Program Outcomes
A strong MPO is:
Focused,
Detailed,
Quantifiable, and
A clear definition of what you would consider a “success” in meeting a
particular need.
64
Measurable Program Outcomes
MPOs should be developed for each strategy in the SDP.
An MPO can be one that relates specifically to instruction and
achievement, or one that relates to supporting migrant students in
being able to participate fully in school.
65
Pop Quiz!
How could you improve the following MPO?
“Each year, the number of out-of-school migrant youth who earn credits
toward high school graduation will increase.
Consider whether the MPO includes:
Which students will directly benefit,
What services will be provided,
What is expected to happen as a result of participation in the services,
and
In what time frame this will occur.
Write your revised MPO.
66
Pop Quiz! Response
The example below addresses some of the weaknesses of the MPO
provided on the previous slide. Does your revised MPO contain
elements similar to the one below?
“In SY 2012, the number of out-of-school migrant youth who
accumulate three or more credits needed for high school graduation
through site-based instructional services will increase by at least 10%.”
67
Putting into Practice
Building on the Alignment Chart in QRRS 7.3
Develop MPOs for each of the strategies you selected.
Ensure that
o The MPOs can pass the “if-then” logic model test (“if this strategy
is selected, then the MPO or MPOs define a clear, quantifiable way
to measure if the strategy is successful.) See Slide 40.
68
Program Evaluation Plan
The SDP lays the foundation for the MEP Evaluation.
Performance targets and MPOs provide the benchmarks against
which to monitor and evaluate the success of the MEP.
The SDP should provide evaluation questions that can be included in
the overall MEP evaluation plan (See Module 8: Program Evaluation).
69
Program Evaluation Plan
The Alignment Chart can assist with developing program evaluation
questions that relate to MPOs.
The example below illustrates a results evaluation question.
70
Measurable
Program
Outcome
(Results)
2013, the reading scale scores for at least 90 % of
Evaluation
Question
percentage of PFS students in grade 3 who
Program Evaluation Plan
The example below illustrates an implementation evaluation question.
71
Measurable
Program Outcome
(Implementation)
2013, 95% of priority for services students in grade 3
participate in at least 60 hours of supplemental
Evaluation
Question
percentage of priority for services students in
Putting into Practice
Building on the Alignment Chart in QRRS 7.3
Develop evaluation questions for each of the MPOs you selected.
Ensure that
o The evaluation questions can pass the “if-then” logical model test
(“if this MPO is identified, then the evaluation questions define a
clear, quantifiable way to collect data”). See Slide 41.
72
See the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit, Section D.5, for an example of a
completed Alignment Chart

Section 7: Planning for Service Delivery Plan Implementation

Planning for Service
Delivery Plan
Implementation
In This Section
Purpose of a Service Delivery Plan
Project Implementation Plan
Components of a Service Delivery
Plan Project Implementation Plan
Key Questions to Consider for
Project Implementation
73
Purpose of a Service Delivery Plan Project
Implementation Plan
Once the strategies,
MPOs, and
evaluation questions
have been
developed, a critical
part of the SDP is the
project plan that
describes how the
SDP will be
implemented.
74
Components of a Service Delivery Plan Project
Implementation Plan
The project implementation plan should include:
Strategies,
Activities,
Dates of implementation/completion,
Staff or agency responsible (SEA or LOA), and
Resources needed.
75
See the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit, Section D.6 for an example of a
SDP Project Plan.
Key Questions to Consider for Project
Implementation
Which strategies will be conducted at the state level, and which ones
will be conducted at the LOA level?
For those conducted at the LOA level, what state-level activities are
needed to support local implementation?
What other agencies and programs will be involved in implementation
of the SDP?
What is the timeline for implementation of the strategies and
activities?
What resources are needed for implementation?
What features of the MEP will impact SDP implementation (e.g.,
summer only program, very large program, very small program)?
76

Section 8: Service Delivery Plan Implementation

Service Delivery
Plan
Implementation
In This Section
Implementation Considerations
Communicating the Service Delivery
Plan
Providing Technical Assistance and
Professional Development
Accountability
Continuous Improvement
77
Implementation Considerations
Without specific strategies for implementation, the SDP will be only a
document that sits on a shelf.
Consider:
Communication Who needs to be familiar with the SDP?
Technical assistance and professional development What skills will
they need to implement the SDP?
Accountability How will MEP staff and local projects be held
accountable for implementing the activities identified in the SDP?
78
Communicating the Service Delivery Plan
Strategies to consider include:
Providing the SDP, along with a cover letter customized for each
stakeholder group, a summary of its responsibilities in the
implementation of the SDP, and invite feedback and questions;
Conducting webinars and trainings to introduce the SDP; and
Creating buy-in by discussing the level of stakeholder input in the
planning process and the ways the SDP will benefit migrant students.
79
Providing Technical Assistance and
Professional Development
Strategies to consider include:
Offering training specific to the strategies included in the SDP to those
involved with implementation;
Training local project staff on aspects of program planning that mirror
the Continuous Program Improvement process conducted at the state
MEP level;
Identifying national and state professional development opportunities
for state and local MEP staff;
Implementing a process to address technical assistance requests
from local projects, especially for new local directors; and
Offering customized technical assistance to LOAs based on monitoring
findings.
80
Ac coun tabil ity
Strategies to consider include:
Ensuring that responsibilities for implementing the SDP are written
into job descriptions for state and local MEP staff;
Including indicators specific to the SDP in the monitoring protocol for
local projects;
Requiring LOAs to address in their subgrant applications how they will
implement the SDP; and
Requiring LOAs to conduct program evaluations
81
See the Service Delivery Plan Toolkit, Section H for more strategies on
ensuring implementation and accountability in local programs.
Continuous Improvement
Strategies to consider include:
Updating the CNA and SDP every three years, or sooner if significant
changes occur in the migrant population or MEP; and
Utilizing findings from the MEP Evaluation to make changes to the
SDP.
o Use formative evaluation data to make mid-cycle adjustments in
the SDP.
o OME suggests conducting a results evaluation (performance
targets and MPOs) every year to ensure continuous progress and
guide service strategy changes to the SDP as needed.
82

Section 9: Wrapping Up

Wrapping Up
In This Section
Key Points
Action Planning
Resources
83
Key Points
The SDP is part of a continuous improvement cycle that includes
needs assessment, service planning, program implementation, and
program evaluation.
The SDP must be the product of joint planning.
The SDP must include state performance targets, a CNA, MPOs,
service delivery strategies, and a program evaluation plan.
An MPO is a clear, quantifiable definition of what you would consider a
“success” in meeting a particular need.
All parts of the SDP should be in alignment.
A project plan will provide a concrete guide for implementing the SDP.
84
Action Planning
Consider the following questions:
When do you need to develop a new SDP? (When was your state’s last
CNA and SDP developed?)
How long do you estimate the process will take?
Who needs to be involved, and when do they need to be contacted?
What resources internal and external will you need? When do you
need to arrange these?
How will you customize the planning process for the size of your state
and number of migrant students?
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Add any actionable items to your MEP planning calendar.
See QRRS 7.5 Service Delivery Plan Action Planning
Resources for the Service Delivery Plan
MEP Guidance on Education of Migratory Children under Title I, Part
C, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, Chapter
IV Explanation of guidelines to implement the laws and regulations
related to the MEP
Service Delivery Plan Toolkit Suggested step-by-step guide with tools
and templates to develop the SDP
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Migrant Education Program Resources
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MEP Officers List of OME contact information
(https://results.ed.gov/about/contact)
Glossary of Terms Alphabetical listing of key terms applicable to
migrant education (https://results.ed.gov/idr-
manual/section/glossary/glossary)